#1
So you how the 3rd in a chord determines whether its major or minor? What would happen if I were to play both the major and minor 3rds (I'm talking about something like a piano, folks, a guitar would be painfully difficult)?
#2
i dont know what it is but it sounds stupid. i just tried it lol

D-0
A-4
E-6

the 6 is the root, A#
the 4 is the minor 3rd
the 0 is the major 3rd
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#6
ahhhh very dissonant? I don't think there's a technical name.It might be something like a raised 11th.
'01 Sunburst Strat>1953 Valco Supro

'06 Jazz bass>'78 Bassman 10

Simple rig fan.
#8
No such thing as a 10th...

A LESSON ON PRESEDENCE:

Many tones can be expressed in different ways within the same chord... i.e. G and Gb... What happens is that certain tones take presedence in the naming (as in, one has more importance and gets named first).

In this case, a 3 and a b3... what happens? The rule is: Major thirds ALWAYS take presendence. So, we now have 3 and #2/#9... #2 = b3, right? They are enharmonic.

Good example: A standard alt chord is the Hendrix chord, the 7#9. It has tones 1 3 5 b7 #9. But #9 is b3, right? But aha, my friends, there is already a major third in the chord, so the minor third must be assigned to a different interval number... b3 -> #9.

Same goes for other tones... got a perfect fifth (5) and an augmented 5th (#5)? Perfect 5th takes presendence... #5 -> b6/b13.

Got a major and a minor 7th? b7 -> #6... but this looks stupid and you'll never really see it. Look for another root.

Got it?


red
Looking for my India/Django.
#10
Quote by redwing_suck
No such thing as a 10th...

A LESSON ON PRESEDENCE:

Many tones can be expressed in different ways within the same chord... i.e. G and Gb... What happens is that certain tones take presedence in the naming (as in, one has more importance and gets named first).

In this case, a 3 and a b3... what happens? The rule is: Major thirds ALWAYS take presendence. So, we now have 3 and #2/#9... #2 = b3, right? They are enharmonic.

Good example: A standard alt chord is the Hendrix chord, the 7#9. It has tones 1 3 5 b7 #9. But #9 is b3, right? But aha, my friends, there is already a major third in the chord, so the minor third must be assigned to a different interval number... b3 -> #9.

Same goes for other tones... got a perfect fifth (5) and an augmented 5th (#5)? Perfect 5th takes presendence... #5 -> b6/b13.

Got a major and a minor 7th? b7 -> #6... but this looks stupid and you'll never really see it. Look for another root.

Got it?


red

Ok, thanks man.