#1
I was just listening to Cream's "Sunshine of Your Love" and realized that in the solo, Clapton breaks out of the pentatonic minor and goes to what sounds like a major key. What scale is he using at about this part?:
E-------------------------------------------------------|
B------------------------10B----------------------------|
G---9b--(9)--7--9---7-----9B-------7~~~-----------------|
D-------------------------------------------------------|
A-------------------------------------------------------|
E-------------------------------------------------------|
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#3
Yeah I was thinking it was that also
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#5
I know that thank you. Actually isn't it a mode?
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#7
Quote by S0ulja23
Actually isn't it a mode?
Indeed it is. Do you understand modes? I have a really good Deffy explanation saved in Word if you want it.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Indeed it is. Do you understand modes? I have a really good Deffy explanation saved in Word if you want it.

Yeah, I know the basics of modes, but that explanation of yours might help.
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#9
Okay then:

Modes of the Major Scale

First of all, a mode is a scale derived from a different scale. The basis behind deriving modes is making a note that is not the tonic your new root note! There are 7 basic modes derived from the major scale. If you don't know the major scale, learn it ASAP. The intervals are W W H W W W H.

Anyways, since there are 7 notes in the major scale, you can have 7 different root notes (or starting points) and still be in the same key. For the purpose of this lesson I'll be using the key of C, because it has no flats and no sharps, and is one of the most common keys.
Here's a diagram to help with the concept:

Key of Cmaj: C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C D E F?
[b]C[/b] Ionian     [b]C[/b] D E F G A B [b]C[/b]
[b]D[/b] Dorian       [b]D[/b] E F G A B C [b]D[/b]
[b]E[/b] Phrygian       [b]E[/b] F G A B C D [b]E[/b]
[b]F[/b] Lydian           [b]F[/b] G A B C D E [b]F[/b]
[b]G[/b] Mixolydian         [b]G[/b] A B C D E F [b]G[/b]
[b]A[/b] Aeolian              [b]A[/b] B C D E F G [b]A[/b]
[b]B[/b] Locrian                [b]B[/b] C D E F G A [b]B[/b]
[b]Bold[/b] notes are root notes of each scale.


First of all, start thinking of notes as scale degrees:

  Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1


The names of the modes, in order, are Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian, and they start on their respective scale degrees.

Starting on the first degree, you get 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1, which is Ionian. Also the major scale.

Starting on the second degree, your notes are D E F G A B C D. This is the Dorian mode. Its formula is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1. Here's why:


 Degrees: 1 2 3  4 5 6 7  1
 D scale: D E F# G A B C# D

D Dorian: D E F  G A B C  D
 Degrees: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1


You should be able to see how the F# was flatted down to F natural and C# down to C natural. That is how each mode's formula is found.

The third mode is Phrygian, its formula is 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1. In the key of C, the notes would be E F G A B C D E = E Phrygian.

The fourth is Lydian. Formula is 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1.

5th is Mixolydian, 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1.

6th is Aeolian, or the natural minor scale. 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1.

7th is Locrian, which is a half diminished scale. 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1.

These formulas are intervals in relation to the major scale. The major scale is used as a reference for just about everything, and modes are no exception.

Therefore, the 7 modes in the key of C are:
C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian
G Mixolydian
A Aeolian
B Locrian
#10
Thanks man that was very detailed! I remember learning this from my Jazz Guitar book, but it's always good to hear other explanations. Also: To transpose modes to different keys, it'd be necessary to know the scale degrees for each key correct?
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join
#12
Yeah I meant the notes
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

PM Soulfly_freak or sock_demon to join