#1
How exactly do you solo in different tunings like open D or Bronyraur or whatever, do you just play the same notes of the scale in a different shape?
#3
Pretty much. From what I've seen, the pattern is gonna change every time you take a different style of tuning (Drop, open, standard, etc) but the scale patterns will always be the same stepping up and down, so all you have to do is find the shapes for each kind of tuning.


*Edit* Honestly I've never tried scales in open tunings*
mmmmmmhmmm

That's exactly what I've been trying to say.

Quote by munkymanmatt
brilliant
#4
So just figure out the notes? That doesn't sound too hard. Im playing some acoustic Zeppelin now and sometimes Page uses really strange tunings, like variations of open.
#5
ok, for example if youre using the a major scale in standard tuning, the main root notes are on the 5th fret. if you played in drop d, then it would change the main roots to the 3rd fret.

so the scale would look like


------3--5-6-----------
------5--7-------------
------5--7-8-----------
------5--7-8-----------
------5-6--8-----------
------3---5------------


so basically just play the same notes, just on a different spot on the fretboard.


and btw, bron - yr - aur isnt really a tuning, it's only used in one song, so learing to solo in that tuning isnt very useful..
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#6
yes, when you are in a tuning such as drop D, blues scales are obsolete and meaningless
#7
The major scale is as follows: Whole (step), whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half. As long as you can understand that, you can find a scale anywhere one any instrument.
the lesser known of the 4
#8
Quote by Ding22
yes, when you are in a tuning such as drop D, blues scales are obsolete and meaningless

are you kidding? is it that hard to move your hand 2 frets down the fretboard?
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#10
drop d is quite easy because you just have 2 d strings, so just play what you are playing on the other d string and you'll stay in scale. the alternate is to move it 2 down and then you can play up and down the scale, but for soloing either works.

then again thats thinking inside the pentatonic box (wow i'm metaphorical today) which is bad. solos can leave the box, the box is just there to make it easier to remember what notes are in the scale.
#11
Quote by Ding22
yes, when you are in a tuning such as drop D, blues scales are obsolete and meaningless

Except they're still there and completely... intact? Unless you have no... er... musicianship...

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
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#12
I Have No Musicianship????? Me????? Are You Crazy????? Can I Speak Only In Questions???????do I Live In My Mothers Basement??????????do I Sip Urine Occasionally??????????????


BTW u reek of homosexuality
#13
Quote by Ding22
I Have No Musicianship????? Me????? Are You Crazy????? Can I Speak Only In Questions???????do I Live In My Mothers Basement??????????do I Sip Urine Occasionally??????????????


BTW u reek of homosexuality

It's funny that you would say that at the end of a post that gay, and especially after saying that the blues scale is meaningless in drop-D.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#14
Any scale is possible in odd-tunings, it just may take a bit more work to achieve them, depending on the tuning. This becomes especially difficult if one of the strings isn't tuned to a "perfect-pitch". For instance, a sharp F. A bit higher than F, but not quite F sharp. So, to play the notes on that string, you would have to bend the string up to play in the same scale.
#15
^Does anybody actually tune like that in Western music? I mean, I know that some MidEastern music uses quarter-tones rather than our semitones, but I can't see that tuning happening in Western music.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#16
Yes, to get "perfect" chords. Naturally, our music is a couple cents off on certain degrees of the chord. It also gives an interesting sound to soloing.