#1
Question to any profesional guitar player:

What does theory help you since you first learning it? like writing song, soloing etc.

I think the answer would help many beginners.
thanks.
#2
It allows your solos to sound more music instead of just a bunch of notes. You can flow better and plus whether you use a lot of it or not, you know it. Never again will you be baffled when someone says "Oh we're in the key of C". It'll help you understand chords better and what chords work together for when you're writing songs, and what scales and arpeggios to play over them. It's definitely worth learning.
Thanks for reading
#3
but many guitar player just play through their feeling when soloing, and its sound good... without leaning theory. For your information i am yet not leaning it (maybe few and a little).
#5
Quote by LrIeYhAmNiA
but many guitar player just play through their feeling when soloing, and its sound good... without leaning theory. For your information i am yet not leaning it (maybe few and a little).


Don't believe that. I garuntee you, anyone youve heard play with a band, and have it sound good, knows theory to some extent. Otherwise it would be impossible to stay in key and everything would sound tense.
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#6
People can 'know' theory without realising, like they know to play a scale in C over a piece in C, and they know how to choose notes for the chords they're playing over. But mercedes is right - it would be very hard indeed to sound good with absolutely no idea about theory.

EDIT: sorry I'm not a professional guitar player, feel free to ignore my post
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#7
Music theory is like "drivers ed". There are some people that can drive well without going through it, but the majority need it to learn how to drive. It's the exact same with your solos.
#8
It depends what your goal in music is. If you don't want to be in a band, or write your own stuff, you don't have to learn theory. I started off by just wanting to cover my favourite bands' songs, and I didn't really need to know theory for that.

If you want to be able to write music, or solo, or improvise, theory is good to know because it gives you a sense of which notes flow together.
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#9
''The more you know about something, the more you influence it'' - some guy
#11
Quote by edg
You don't have to learn anything. Be as ignorant as you want.

I like the way another member put it:

Thousands of other musicians spent thousands of years figuring all this
stuff out so you don't have to.


thousands?

yeah i can see the cave men scratching staffs into the walls and banging their heads trying to remember italian terms

Our lord big J sittin at his desk writing out scales

hundreds
#12
Well, don't take it so literally.

Anyway, it most likely IS thousands -- musicians and years.

The current scale forms took a LONG time to develop and that's all part of it.

A very interesting musical theory history factoid:

Some early instruments were simple flute type thingys. With a hole for each
finger to play (not including the thumb) it came out to 4 holes. The early
scale was 4 notes. They came up with the formula in Whole and Half steps:

W W W H

At some point, this scale was extended to the present 8 note scale. They took
two of those scales and pasted a Whole step between them:

W W W H - W - W W W H

The current form of the major scale!

If you look at it like that, you can really begin to start seeing lots of interesting
symmetries in scales and patters between the 1st part of the scale and the
2nd.
#13
^ they're only 7 intervals in a scale. so its W-W-H-W-W-W-W if its an 8 note scale
#16
Back in the ole day they used modes, not scales. And everything was ternary (sp) form. (A-B-A-C-A)
#17
As much as I hate his music, I like John Frusciante's outlook on theory:

"Not learning theory is like saying "I don't want to use words to communicate, I just want to rub my penis over everybody" **** that, I want to do BOTH"

Also, when Satriani said to his pupils (Kirk hammet, Steve Vai....) "Today, I'm gonna teach you some theory", they'd respond "why, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan never learned any"

Satch replied "Can you play as well as them? No, now learn how to"
Populus vult decipi. Decipiatur.

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#18
When learning how to make a solo sound good without learning theory, its kind of a guess and check type thing unless you have played guitar long enough to know exactly the kind of tone your goign to get from each note and what would sound good, when you know theory you already know the exact notes that you can play to make it sound good, and should definately be learned.
#19
But many beginners doesn't know where and how to start for learning theory. I know there are many things such lesson, scale, pentatonic, octave etc, in this site, but if someone can sort them from beginng (of learning theory), that may be good. Because too many people messing around looking for the Theory. Like, first you need to learn this, second learn this, then ... etc.
thanks.
#20
Well, the best way to learn theory other than expensive lessons is playing an instrument in a school band or w/e. I started Trumpet when I was 9, and that helped me learn all my basic theory, and after that learning the stuff you need to know for guitar came along real easy.
#21
Since I even began to learn theory,my solo's are 100% better. I implore you to learn it.
When your body's tired, exercise your mind.
#22
Now i know my theory, I can find the right chords to use in certain situations, I know how to create certain sounds using modes (IE happy = Ionian Mode; sad = Aeolian Mode; Spanish = Phrygian Mode) and so on.

Theory is ideal to use.
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#23
Quote by Logz
Now i know my theory, I can find the right chords to use in certain situations, I know how to create certain sounds using modes (IE happy = Ionian Mode; sad = Aeolian Mode; Spanish = Phrygian Mode) and so on.

Theory is ideal to use.


You're still using modes? wow...

Step into the 21st, learn some scales
#24
Quote by Preid
You're still using modes? wow...

Step into the 21st, learn some scales




n00b, you wanna learn about steps and half steps. Thats where its all at
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