#1
I've just begun playing guitar recently, have a great beginner's setup and am really into playing guitar. Usually, I'd assume, most people who pick up/buy a guitar buy it on a whim/fad kinda thing... My mindset was that I want to diversify and be great at something. So I bought this guitar, and turns out I honestly, truly love playing it. I end up looking at the internet/researching stuff more than I do play it but I honestly like playing.

I'm 23, in college and going to graduate next year, have an internship but for the most part have plenty of free time. I wish I could ONLY stay home and practice guitar everyday all day but I can practice a lot.

So there are a lot of guitar players out there.. is there any reason why I couldn't in say, 10-15 years become one of the guitar greats?

If I have creativity and passion for it with dedication is that what it takes?

Should I be at all discouraged that I'm 23, starting late in life (relatively) & have a career ahead of me in a few years as a budding scientist?

I started typing when I was 13.. had my computer keyboard been a guitar or piano I would have been famous by now lol
#2
So there are a lot of guitar players out there.. is there any reason why I couldn't in say, 10-15 years become one of the guitar greats?

If I have creativity and passion for it with dedication is that what it takes?

i dont think theres any reason why u couldnt get good. although u would have found it easier to do so had u started earlier, sure, if its something u really love, go for it and u could do some awesome stuff!
i need to get a better signature.
#3
13 is late for a famous pianist to start... I've been told that if you start after 6 or 7, you won't ever play some of the hardest piano pieces out there. I'm inclined to think it may be true...

As for guitar... *shrug* some of the best guitarists I know started around the same time you did. Interesting thing about guitar is that it doesn't take very long, with good direction, to get up to playing some of the more difficult pieces already written. Guitar just doesn't have the repetoire to have pushed physical limitations yet, though it's getting there.

Point being, with time and practice, even with a late start, you should be able to pick up most of the guitar music that's written now. Whether or not you'll ever be renowned as a great guitarist, that's not something anybody can tell you.
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#4
Thanks for the replies

sucks for pianists.. everything seems much more formal in classical piano though

with guitar it seems like it's all about soul and creativity

I do have the internet though, which is a tremendous resource obviously not available to people before like the late 80's
Last edited by amazingdm at Jun 1, 2006,
#5
ironically, most of the great guitarists didn't set about trying to be great guitarists. John Petrucci, Paul Gilbert, they started around 13 and weren't serious players till about 15. There was just a guitar lying around the house, and they picked it up and learnt to play a few chords. Eventually they realised, im not bad at this and really started practising. Don't worry about hyper practising or anything, and being a great. If its meant to be then you'll know. Also the journey of learning guitar over the years will change your attitude and goals. You may want to be the next steve vai now, but in 2 years you might not.
Have a dream, but have a modest dream for the while, it'll be extremely fulfilling when you reach it. My original dream, which is extremely uncool was I wanted to be able to play system of a down and limp bizkit stuff, and really be able to produce that big numetal metal sound. and I reached it and it did alot for my happiness and where I wanted to go on guitar. Now I'm looking at being able to play notes as fast as I hear in my head. One step at a time
#6
There is no such thing as to late. Tal Farlow started playing guitar at the age of 21 and he ended up in the Red Norvo Trio.
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#7
^don't forget he learned the guitar in one year
Quote by Jimi Hendrix
The Blues Is Easy To Play But Hard To Feel.

Quote by Chris Impellitteri
I Promise That My Solos Will Only Get Faster.
[Practice Makes Perfect][Hell Yeah]
#8
You should have no problem becoming a great guitarist. Rusty Cooley started at 15, as did Allan Holdsworth, arguably two of the technically best guitarists alive. Shawn Lane only seriously practiced for 6 years on the physical aspect of playing.

So physically, technically, no bother. Creatively, and musically, you might think is purely natural "born with it" ability - but it aint. You can learn to compose beautiful songs, headbanging hard rock, whatever. Just go to it with feel and passion and when that's combined with good physical ability and a basic knowledge of music theory, well, thats what we call magic.

You'll probably never be famous, but you can be fantastic and enjoy playing. Good luck, and enjoy the journey!
#9
biological age is irrelvent. no one will care how old you are if you write great music
#10
Quote by Freepower
as did Allan Holdsworth
17

the greatest jazz guitarist (Wes Montgomery) started a the age of 18.
Quote by Jimi Hendrix
The Blues Is Easy To Play But Hard To Feel.

Quote by Chris Impellitteri
I Promise That My Solos Will Only Get Faster.
[Practice Makes Perfect][Hell Yeah]
#12
I am also a late bloomer. It doesn't matter to me if I become the greatest guitar player ever or even a one hit wonder. I don't care about that. I just want to be able to pick up a guitar and come up with my own stuff and I can say,"Yea, I wrote that." I don't care how many peole know that I wrote it, its just an accomplishment that I know that I have done. I want to be able to (as soon as I find a girl who isn't a psycho) sing to a girlfriend/wife. It doesn't matter if its my own music or "Lips of an Angel" by Hinder. Chicks love that kinda stuff.
As long as you are happy with what you are doing then it doesn't matter what others think about your playing.
#13
You can probably become quite skilled, but whether you'll be famous is another story. The best players are not always the most famous, anyway.
#14
If you like playing guitar you should keep doing it! But don't expect to be one of the guitar greats one day. Of course it's alright to dream once in a while about being very skilled and famous, but it really is an unrealistic goal.
#15
Oh Absolutely you CAN become a great guitarist. No Doubt in my mind at all.
For one thing, 23 isn't old at all. Believe me.
Second, it's NEVER too late to start.
Third, with the right kind of practice, 10 hours a day, could very easily get you there
in 10 years.

Finally, you may come to realize this as you progress, it's not so much about the
end result, but the process to get you towards it. It's not a race. It's not a
competition (unless you're in a contest). You have an entire lifetime to work
on all the problems you might find along the way. Don't sweep them under a rug.
If you ignore problems, they never go away until you fix them and there's no time
like the present to start working on them.
#16
i think psychodelia and kpasa have it down, do it cuz you love it and if you do it for that reason it'll totally show through, don't worry about selling a cd or playing a sold out venue, cuz if you really love playing music to make killer music, that stuff doesn't matter and chances are you prolly have a better chance doing something w/ yer music if you do it for he love of the art (more musicians have said "we just played because we loved playing for people, we never expected to get signed or anything" than the other way around "oh we were looking to get $$$.... KISS is the only band i could think of that fit these shoes) and secondly some of the best guitarists in the world you'll never hear of 'cuz instead of rocking out in a studio, they're sitting on their front porch sipping some tea or a beer and playing a piece of classical (or blues or rock or reggae or whatever) music that really moves them.
#17
Whether Wes was the best ever or not is open to interpretation, certainly the funkiest. Tal Farlow was quite a guitarist indeed. Yes by 1 year he was performing professionally. I wish I was as driven as he was.
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#18
Good replies.

I didn't start playing guitar until I was 24. I started even later than you. I am by no means a great guitar player, but I have learned more within 2 years (I'm 26 now) than I thought I would in 10. I think being older, you may have more self disciple in practicing.

You can become proficient at guitar within a pretty short period of time... and you'll have years to perfect your craft and become great.

I also thought it would be pointless to start playing late in life and I pushed the guitar away for several years. Eventually I caved it and had to play. Now it makes me think of how good I would be right now if I was actually playing of all those years that I wasted talking myself out of it.

Don't expect to become famous, as others said. You can suck and still become famous. You will definetely become very good if you keep at it. You may become of the guitar greats and never even have an audience.