#1
okay so i asked this yesterday, and i know that if you double flat a b you get an a

BUT
what if:
theres an a flat in the key
and it shows an a
but its double flatted?

is it just the same? is it just kind of stating that they're flatting whats already flat and that makes it a double flat?

edit: it also shows a "P.T." above some notes, what does that stand for?
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Last edited by EZLN libertad at Jun 1, 2006,
#2
Yeah, it's the same. It's just an Ab lowered another half step,

Edit: ...if there's two flat signs. If the Ab is in the key signature and it shows an A with only one flat sign, it's still just an Ab.
Last edited by spoonfulofshred at Jun 1, 2006,
#4
it would be a diatonic g note (or Abb)
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#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I don't think that would happen.


-_- yes it can...

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#6
Quote by thepagesaretorn
-_- yes it can...

if u need any more music theory help, go to www.teoria.com
If the key is Ab and the note is an Abb...??? Why wouldn't that be Gb?


Do not ever arrogantly try to correct me again.
#7
You post is rather hard to understand, so if an A is flatted in a key and then it is double flatted?

Double flats are most commonly used in chord making. For instance, a major 6th is properly written with I III V VIIbb. So you have a double flatted 7th rather than a 6th. Also in diminished chords, you have the same although you also have the flatted V and sometimes III.

Other than that, Im not sure mate.

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#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If the key is Ab and the note is an Abb...??? Why wouldn't that be Gb?


Do not ever arrogantly try to correct me again.



as someone said, if its marked flat and its already marked flat in the key sig, its the same

so take an a
double flat it
g

even if its flat in the key sig its still g
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#10
no, read spoonfuls post


also, the pages are torn
thank you sooooo so much for that site
ive been trying to find something like that for a while
Quote by beadhangingOne
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Last edited by EZLN libertad at Jun 1, 2006,
#11
Quote by EZLN libertad
okay so i asked this yesterday, and i know that if you double flat a b you get an a...BUT what if: theres an a flat in the key and it shows an a but it's double flatted? is it just the same? is it just kind of stating that they're flatting whats already flat and that makes it a double flat? edit: it also shows a "P.T." above some notes, what does that stand for?
Accidentals override the key signature and any other prior accidentals for that note. It's as if the key signature doesn't exist as soon as the accidental appears in the score. In your example, then, the double-flat negates the Ab in the key signature. You would play an Abb, which is identical to the tone G.
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#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Hang on, so there is an Ab written on the staff AND there is an Ab in the key signature? That's Abb, not G.


flats dont add together, theyre simply what they say on the page. if there's a flat on A in the signature and a flat on the note there, it doesnt become a double flat, it's just one flat. Now if there's two flats next to the A and a flat on A in the signature it's two flats. Sure u could do a triple flat...but no one does that unless they want something really really diminished...but u wont do that cuz it's really awkward and dissonant and would probably maybe involve two notes that are diatonic (like a triple flatted G would become an E, even tho really since it'd be diminished, the E would be triply flattened too, so that would really be weird...yeah nevermind about that O:-P )
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#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I don't think that would happen.


Why wouldn't it happen? You are just wrong. Diminished chord eh? Say you are in the key of D flat and you want a D flat diminished chord. Well you're gonna write it D flat, F flat, A double flat. A diminished chord is just a minor triad with a lowered fifth. Now of course, this is an unnatural diminished chord. The diminished chord only naturally occurs in the seventh degree of a scale, assuming you are in a major key. In the key of D flat, C, E flat, G double flat would be the seventh triad (diminished).

I think that should clear it up.