#1
This piece is pretty much a variation on Bach's Tocatta and Fugue. I basically listened to it and took some of its main themes and combined it with my own ideas. I left the most recognizable parts of the piece and combined it with stuff i came up with. This is a variation of the piece, it is not completely different or completely the same so don't say that I just copied Bach because that was part of the purpose. Give me some comments and I'll return the favor.
Attachments:
Fugue.zip
#2
it's hard to crit because i'm not familiar enough with the original to determine which parts were there already, aside from the beginning of tocatta and the theme of fugue. alot of parts sounded really messy and some just really bad. some of it was really cool, but again...i think you should distinguish between the original parts and your own. that would make it alot easier to analyze

here's one of mine: woo!
Last edited by afortuneinlies at Jun 2, 2006,
#4
interesting. the rhythms are all off in the beginning. i don't really appreciate that. this is such a rad song, so i don't think it needs to be reworked at all. you should really do your own. you really have a classical theme to you. have you taken much theory or studied classical music? it's funny that you submitted this when you did though because we talked about fugues in my music class on wednesday and today. i'm thinking about writing my own. this must've taken quite some time. solid effort. those trills sound weird. lousy powertab. you can always write them out as notes with rhythms. some good stuff here. ohhhhh the last chord was so unsatisfying. don't end it like that. end it with a d major chord.

here's more for you to check out:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=351546
#5
I haven't learned much theory, but I do listen to classical music quite a bit, I especially enjoy Bach, Vivaldi, and Beehtoven. I love to try and combine the classical sounds and metal sounds. I find it more challenging than just dropping down to D and chugging the crap out of every riff and song.
#6
Sounds like a merry-go-round in one part, I loved it.
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#7
haha, nice, i could never quite get the hang of fugues with all the subject and answer, second statements of the subject and answer, strettos, all the constant modulations and everything else that i cant remember from AS music classes, but anyway, all sounding cool, huge amount of kudos since i know how hard it is to write a fugue and follow the huge amount of rules and still come out with something that sounds good. nice work....also random fact, that piece was apparantly not written by bach and was infact one of his students, unless my music teacher was chatting rubbish.....
#9
found this on wikipedia, apparantly its all just theory but still pretty interesting,

In "BWV 565: a toccata in D minor for organ by J. S. Bach?", Early Music, vol. 9, July, 1981, pp. 330-337, Peter Williams argued that the work is not by Bach. In support of this view, he cites the following:

There is no autograph score.
The copyist who created the oldest known manuscript (Johann Ringk, 1717-1778) was a student of a student of Bach's, who had access to some of the Bach manuscripts and whose reputation is dubious: he is believed to have passed off inauthentic (as well as authentic) works under the composer's name.
The work abounds in fermatas and dynamic markings, not ordinarily used in organ music in Bach's day.
Lastly, Williams alleges that various musical passages in the work are simply too crude musically to have been Bach's work.
Williams' views have more recently been endorsed in a book-length study by the musicologist Rolf Dietrich Claus, cited below.

This view is further endorsed by the proliferation of undisguised consecutive fifths in the piece (no less than 10 bars in), which Bach was always careful to avoid. Even if the piece were a transcription of a solo instrumental work, these fifths still form an integral part of the work.

ps, sorry bout spamming up your thread, just thought it was an interesting point
#10
Yeah i find it interesting too. I have never heard this about this piece or any of his pieces actually being written by this other guy. It is kinda wierd though, but who can really tell unless you were there. Its kinda like some conspiracy like the Kennedy assasination or the da Vinci code.