#1
Why is timing more difficult than learning rhythm / scales / leads / and modes?

The best players in the world in a band that doesn't play tight, sounds awful and absolutely hideous.

My advice to you young players out there... remember that timing is just as, or more important than skill.
#2
I've never had a problem with timing...or rhythm...or anything with guitar for that matter...

Does that mean I'm a prodigy?
My Gear:

Washburn WI14 Electric
Washburn D10s Acoustic
Marshall MG100HDFXR Special Edition
Marshall MG412AR Special Edition

Quote by Danno13
^Xenn is my favorite MG owner EVAR.

Quote by jj1565
^ Xenn fav MG user evar
#4
i have natural rhythm i guess. the thing with rock is that the primary time comes from whatever the drummer is doing. everyone else has to fit to him.
#5
^2nded. I too have a natural rythym, I'm constanly tapping stuff out on random surfaces.
#12 of the "Ibanez SZ over RG Club!" PM ibanez4life SZ! to join!
#6
yea i agree. i used to play drums i have forgotten most of it but i renenber that everyone counts on the drummer and if the drummer is wrong everyone is wrong
malyn sprite spear
#7
Get a Metronome
R.I.P.:
Randy Rhoads (December 6, 1956 – March 19, 1982)
Dimebag Darrell (August 20, 1966 – December 8, 2004)
Les Paul (June 9, 1915 – August 13, 2009)
Ronnie James Dio (July 10, 1942 – May 16, 2010)
#8
Timing - Rhythm - Transition is all separate categories.

It's easy to tap or strum on a beat... but consistent rhythm on 1-3 or 2-4-2-1 or 1-3-4 and etc.... then transition to another pattern isn't all that simple. (if it was, all bands would be tight)

I agree that the drummer is the back-bone... but to get tighter, I would suggest a metronome. It's a single consistent tick to get and even tighter tight timing... while the drums have a *bong* / reverb-ish sound that a guitarist can play sloppy within that frame.... but a tight band is dead on.