#1
I left for vacation yesterday and I came to the mountains in Vermont. I was just wondering if the Altitude would effects the wood of the neck at all. It seems like my strings are buzzing and just doesn't fell the same. How would I adjust this if I need to? I have never dealt with the truss rod.
#2
at what altitude did you start out at? i'm betting its all in your head. you would need a significant increase to notice any difference. did you get altitude sickness? your body would feel the difference before your guitar. plus vermont mountains, yeah big and all, are relatively small mountains.
Last edited by VR6 Stoner at Jun 6, 2006,
#3
I started out at sea level. The Vermont mountains are super high, but I didn't know if they would effect it at all.
#5
Lol they aren't super high compared to some.
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#7
I dont' think the altitude woudln't do anything, but hte weather would. Is it colder or warmer up there then at sea level?
#8
Quote by VR6 Stoner
super high??? ever been out west?


lol, I meant AREN'T super high.
#9
weather really screws your instruments up if you dont take care of them. Especially if you live somewhere with hot humid summers and cold dry winters (like I do).

The action can actually change with the seasons, since wood expands when its humid and shrinks when its dry.

I think this is more important than altiutude.
#10
Barometric pressure won't affect the guitar's neck. However, ambient temperature and humidity will. If the mountains of Vermont have a drastically difference temperature and humidity than where you normally live, then that will definately have an effect.
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