#1
I see many many tabs like so:
e-------------------------------------------|
b---------------------2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2---|
g-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2---|
d-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2---|
a-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0---|
e-------------------------------------------|

Now my question is, how do you hit just those 3 or 4 strings while strumming? I seem to hit too many, or my strumming doesnt sound good when I do only hit those strings. Is it pretty much practice, or am I missing something?
#2
try fretting them in such a way that your fretting hand can help mute the strings you dont want to hit. also, just practice it very slowly strumming out what you want, doing it perfectly but slowly. try practicing with a metronome or something too. you'll eventually get it it just takes a lot of practice i remember i really struggled with hitting strings i didnt want to.
cKy
#3
More wrist action and less arm action. Movements with your wrist are much more controllable.


Or learn to play like Stevie Ray Vaughan.
#4
missing the e string, or a string, or any of those is easy enough-just strum lower. as for the higher strings, well, these chords, you dont need to worry. the first set is E Major - go ahead, hit the b and high e string. same with the next chord - A Major.
if you feel it is essential to miss those high e's and b's, use the lower part of your fretting fingers to damnpen the strings. i know, it is likely that if you took lessons, your instructor probly said to arch your fingers - in this case, let them fall over the strings ya dont want being strummed.
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bassmonkey16@nexopia
#6
Quote by bassmonkey16
missing the e string, or a string, or any of those is easy enough-just strum lower. as for the higher strings, well, these chords, you dont need to worry. the first set is E Major - go ahead, hit the b and high e string. same with the next chord - A Major.


actually that's not true for A Major... you don't want to play the high or low E when playing an A Major.
Last edited by jimtaka at Jun 6, 2006,
#10
Quote by wrsrider
yes it is


my bad, you knew what i meant

and to the threadstarter... the answer to your question is: practice practice practice.
#11
Quote by noobest
But A must be the root note

A is the root note no matter what note actually comes first. It's only guitarits who use the silly D/F# (that is, specifying the bass note) chord notation. For everyone else, it's just called an inversion, since F# occurs in a D chord anyway. If you put the 5 note first, it's a 2nd inversion; if you use the 3 note first, it's a first inversion. So an A major with the low E played open is still A major, just inverted.

Edit: Not to say that the bass note notation is useless. But it exists, IMO, because most guitar players (including myself) are lazy and can't read sheet music. Besides, reading guitar chords is a bitch.
Hi, I'm Peter
Last edited by Dirk Gently at Jun 6, 2006,
#12
Quote by Dirk Gently
A is the root note no matter what note actually comes first. It's only guitarits who use the silly D/F# (that is, specifying the bass note) chord notation. For everyone else, it's just called an inversion, since F# occurs in a D chord anyway. If you put the 5 note first, it's a 2nd inversion; if you use the 3 note first, it's a first inversion. So an A major with the low E played open is still A major, just inverted.


i never knew that, thanks dirk!