#1
hey i got a question.

i can play riffs with 16ths at 120-140 bpm almost perfectly clean here and there,

but i struggle to get 16ths at 100 when doing chromatic scales (1234 up, 4321 down)

is this normal/ok? or should i be getting faster with the chromatics?

(and when i post the speed, i mean the highest possible speed with keeping all the notes clean)
#2
well if you practice chromatic scales indepth and a lot and you're not getting faster then no it's not normal

if you rarely practice them then yeah its normal to not be that fast.

just keep practicing them
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#3
nooo im not asking "am i not fast enuff"

im asking in comparison to my riffing, is it normal that my up and down chromatic scale speed is slower than what i can do in riffs?

and baack in the day i stilll practiced, but not with a metronome, and i was basically doing like 8ths at 120. now i do most of the time quarters at 40 bpm, and then a little bit of going almost to my limit in speed to see how far i progress.
#4
you just have to work on finger independency, and this can be achieved by playing chromatic scales up and down the neck to a metronome, starting slow and gradually speeding up...it would be normal seeing that a lot of riffs don't utilize all the fingers like chromatics...it just takes consistent and efficient practice
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Last edited by axe_grinder247 at Jun 7, 2006,
#5
can someone explain 16th and 8th notes to me? i don't really understand what that means.
#7
again, i stress that its not about my overall speed, its about my riff speed compared to my chromatic speed but so far, thanks.

and i DO work on finger independancy, chromatics and songs/riffs with metronome, all the good stuff and i do feel i am makign progress. its just the first big chunk of my bassing was growing musically, and now i felt i need to grow technicaly.

once im balanced i'll grow both ways nicely
#8
well, to understand 8th and 16th notes you have to understand tempo, bars, time signature, and measures..well, briefly, in a 4/4 time signature, 8th notes are 8 notes per measure, or 2 notes per click of the metronome...16ths are 16 notes per measure, or 4 notes per click...there are also triplets, which are 12 notes per measure, or 3 notes per click...very brief, it's hard to explain without diagrams, i hope i helped a bit...cas can most likely explain it perfectly...not very clear at all, i know
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it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


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#9
an average song is in 4/4 , meaning there are 4 notes in the bar, and the quarter(4) note takes the beat.

so 70% of popular songs (going out on a limb just for exampling) are in 4/4, and have that "1 2 3 4" feel.

that "1 2 3 4" , if you can count it in your head, is quarter notes. quarter notes is usually the beat, like what you'd tap your foot or clap your hands too (or half notes if its a faster song and you cant keep up lol).

eight notes are if you took that same amount of time, and played 8 notes in the time you'd usually play those 4. so it would be like "1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and". so every 2 notes line up with a quarter notes.

16ths= 1 ee and uh 2 ee and uh 3 ee and uh 4 ee and uh. these are 4 per beat.

get these down before learning triplets, or they could possible screw with your head.

half notes is 1 for every 2 quarter notes, so in a " 1 2 3 4" feel, its "1 (pause) 2 (pause)" , but there is no pause, just showing how its 2x as long.

whole is the whole 4 notes. "1 (long long pause lol)"
#10
Well, i can't tell you exactly why its slower, perhaps the constant position shifts, or the different picking pattern, or the fact you have to use all 4 fingers (which means bringing in your weakest)...

Those are some starting points, but what exactly makes chromatics harder to play fast for you? Figure it out, work on it. (if you care!)
#11
thanks for the tip guys, it makes a lot more sense now. so does this mean i should practice with a low bpm on the metronome and try working my way to 16th notes?