#1
I've been playing guitar now for about 4-5 months, and I can play some songs....and well, my friend always makes fun of the way I strum. I strum downwards (E to e) all the time, and never strum upwards (e to E). He said it helps with rhythm a lot or something...I don't know, I just need some suggestions on how to fix this.
#3
just force yourself to alternate down up down up etc. it may be awkward at first but after a while it will feel natural
#4
So just strum up and down, up and down?
My friend always figures out which way the song he listens to to play is strumming......how long do you think that'll take to learn?
Thanks for the help guys.
#6
Watch the double posting

And I do that with some chords. And you just need to get passed the awkwardness of strumming upwards at first.
#7
get some strumming patterns, man. you'll never get very far with just down up down up. even in non-blues stuff, use bass note strum then alt. bass note strum. or variations thereof.
#8
Quote by crazyjadedhippy
get some strumming patterns, man. you'll never get very far with just down up down up. even in non-blues stuff, use bass note strum then alt. bass note strum. or variations thereof.


Ok, someone jump in here and help another newbie.

One of the songs I'm working on has the strum pattern as:

B U D U B U D U
1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +
(sorry I can't get the count to line up but ya get the picture)

now, I know the U's are UP and the D's are DOWN
what's the B?
Last edited by outlawgal at Jun 10, 2006,
#10
Not sure what you're trying to say. I guess you'll need alternate strumming anytime use an eighteenth note or faster, I guess that's the reason you say your friend just listens to the song to figure out when to use alternate strumming, so he's looking for the note length.

Yeah, it's actually easier for me to use alternate picking now, then when I first started out. Yeah, you just go up and down on a string. Never go down down or up up together. Look at your beginners book. It lays it all out for you and simple to understand.
#11
About the "commiting chords to memory" not everyone sticks that stuff in their head its just what your into, for D7 that is most commonly used in a jazz style.
#12
They key to good strumming is to keep your wrist in constant motion.

Try this... notice there are two consecutive downstrokes at the start; you must make sure you follow this rhythm or your strumming will be inconsistent and lack fluency.
Ask the friend who makes fun of you to check if you're following the rhythm properly. And now, you can use a Dsus4 chord in context, too

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