#1
I posted the same question in hte acoustic forum but i figured this one might be a good place to ask too. I'm looking at either a martin or epiphone masterbuilt acoustic. The prob is either they are very rare(epi) are take months to order(martin) I thought a could buy a righty Dreadnought one n switch the nut but the guy at my guitar said its not good to do when u spend good $$ on a guitar. He said the intonation would b ****ed up bc of the opposite bridge angle. Is there anything i could do to mod it or would a righty b fine upsidedown...or is he right n i need to find a left handedd one.
#2
The shop here took a righty acoustic and flipped the nut and put on a new lefty bridge
#3
Quote by kurtpage
I posted the same question in hte acoustic forum but i figured this one might be a good place to ask too. I'm looking at either a martin or epiphone masterbuilt acoustic. The prob is either they are very rare(epi) are take months to order(martin) I thought a could buy a righty Dreadnought one n switch the nut but the guy at my guitar said its not good to do when u spend good $$ on a guitar. He said the intonation would b ****ed up bc of the opposite bridge angle. Is there anything i could do to mod it or would a righty b fine upsidedown...or is he right n i need to find a left handedd one.


I know at least one of my local guitar stores has a conversion kit for acoustic.

Depending on the type of bridge that's been fitted, it's possible you could flip/find a reversed bridge for it, as well as the nut.

If not, you could see about getting it re-saddled, which can get expensive. But, y'know, less expensive than a whole new guitar.
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#4
Not to sound pessimistic, but if the guitar was designed as a righty, then it won't sound as good as a lefty. Well made guitars arn't symmetrical so that the sound will reflect in different ways. It just won't sound the same.
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#5
Quote by PJF1000
Not to sound pessimistic, but if the guitar was designed as a righty, then it won't sound as good as a lefty. Well made guitars arn't symmetrical so that the sound will reflect in different ways. It just won't sound the same.

I don't know where you come from, but sound waves do not obey the law of gravity here. So it doesn't matter.
Last edited by Ironflippy at Jun 9, 2006,
#6
sound waves dont but the manufactures do, everything on the guitar is going to be angled so that it feels comfortable the other way, some people make it look easy but from experience its realllyyy uncomfortable.
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#7
Thats a bunch of BS. I broke my fingers on my left hand and couldnt fret with it so I just fliiped my guitar over and went on about playing. It was hell trying to learn chords upside down, but it sounded just as good and it wasnt the least bit uncomfortable as far as holding it.

But you could probably get a new nut and bridge for it pretty easy, and it dont f*ck up intonation.
#8
You have to get a new nut and a new bridge installed. Depending on the brand of the guitar it might sound just as good as a lefty, but it might not. The reason is that some brands use symetrical bracing when other brands (like Martin) have the soundboard braced with a treble side and a bass side. If you put the trebble strings on the bass side and the bass strings on the treble side you might find that the guitar sounds a little bit tubby. On the other hand some people actually like the change in tone you get from bracing it backwards.

Anyway, getting a luthier to change the nut and the bridge should cost you around $100 to $200 depending on the luthier and where you live. This is not something you can easily do yourself and yes you have to swap the bridge and the nut. If you just swap the nut then the intontation on your guitar will be off because the high E is 1/8" shorter than the low E.
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