#1
Hey

I want to know, what are the best ways to practice to get good at soloing in various different scales and stuff. I dont consider myself a good soloist at all but the only true way I can solo without thinking about it is in a pentatonic scale.

I hate when people brag about being self taught but thats how I learned. So I don't have the greatest knowledge of guitar but want to become good.

Any advice or anything would be cool.
FIJI
#2
hey dude if you want to get good at solos then you have to start out slow. try learning solos like the one in the very beginning of "fade to black" by metallica or the one in "nothin else matters" by metallica. You have to start out slow and work your way up. solos are easy once you get them down. You will learn all the bends, fulls, vibratos and how to keep timing and speed along the way. im a self taught guitar player so i know what its like to be out there and not know what the **** to do, with nobody to help me out. and remeber you have to practice a lot to get a solo down, just dont let the song intimidate you. before you know it you'll be plulling solos out of your ass like dimebag darrell used to.
#3
I've got a good grasp on soloing, but since I only solo in pentatonics my solos start to sound a like, what I meant to ask is how to diversify my soloing techniques.
FIJI
#4
Quote by Disturbed42
dimebag darrell used to.
I hate how we have to talk about him in the past tense.

Anywhooooo....


Learn all your techniques: bending, hammer-ons, pull-offs, tapping, slides, vibrato, harmonics, all this stuff. You don't have to be unbelievable to play solos, but make sure you're competent. Learn a couple of scales, probably blues, Aeolian, and a few others. Learn some of your favorite solos, obviously making sure that you don't try something way above your level. Try to play stuff in your head. Play guitar solos in your head when you're not paying attention in school (though it will be summer soon). That will give you ideas. Train your ear as well.
#5
actually I was going to ask if I was crazy for thinking of solos in my head....

the only bad part of that is that the solos in my head don't match the solos on my guitar... my head thinks im ****ing steve vai
FIJI
#6
That's okay. Eventually your technique will catch up with your head and then you'll be able to play some pretty cool stuff.


And you're not crazy for playing solos in your head. In fact, you should try to figure out what you're doing. Try to hear the intervals and imagine those intervals being played on a guitar.
#7
Quote by ShizNick
actually I was going to ask if I was crazy for thinking of solos in my head....

the only bad part of that is that the solos in my head don't match the solos on my guitar... my head thinks im ****ing steve vai



look into ear training. once you can recognize intervals, and play them on your guitar, you'll be able to do that a lot better.
#8
yeah, I usually forget what I was thinking before I reach my guitar anyway..

I need to find a ****ing band
FIJI
#9
Trying to figure out harmony parts in my head is a pain in the ass for me.

Sometimes I mix a little improv into my practicing. I record a background, then try playing in different styles and scales over it, then finally just letting go and playing like I would in performance. When I get to the point where I feel like I'm spewing out crap ideas, I go back to practicing specific solos. Its a nice break though, and gives you a chance to be a little creative in practice.
#10
No one ever seems to mention this but leaving SPACE in your solo's is very important. No one wants to hear you play in every gap of your solo. Give it some space so people can take in what your playing. Thinking melodically helps too. Elaborate on ideas that you play.
::::Soul Prospect::::
♪♫♫♫♪
#11
use your ear and learn the techniques
Quote by Jimi Hendrix
The Blues Is Easy To Play But Hard To Feel.

Quote by Chris Impellitteri
I Promise That My Solos Will Only Get Faster.
[Practice Makes Perfect][Hell Yeah]
#13
Quote by ShizNick
I've got a good grasp on soloing, but since I only solo in pentatonics my solos start to sound a like, what I meant to ask is how to diversify my soloing techniques.


Well, it sounds like you really need to develop skills using other scales, especially
the diatonic scale. In order to use the diatonic scales better, you need to begin
following the chord changes.
#14
Find a solo you like and learn it. It takes patience but the next one will be easier and easier. You learn bends through the solos you play but it's better because they are incorperated in a actually coordinated song. Don't just learn scales since they don't teach you how to coordinate, they arent as fun, and it's just too easy to play random notes. I am completely self taught too, it's not that hard if you have the patience and are willing to sit foe 3+ hours to learn a solo if you aren't willing you don't want to learn them that bad.
#15
Quote by POTFORTY2
Don't just learn scales since they don't teach you how to coordinate, they arent as fun, and it's just too easy to play random notes


Oh man, that is SO wrong.

Part of scale practice is PRECISELY to teach your fingers coordination. The way
you practice them must be very different from how I do and maybe you don't
understand why it's a very good idea to practice them.

Aren't as fun? Well, maybe not. But, your attitude is part of what makes something
fun or not. I find scale practice to be pretty enjoyable and a nice challenge.

No idea what you mean by the "random notes" part.

Copying other solos and riffs also has its merits. But, it's no substitution for other
benefits you get from scale practice.