#1
im just wondering what the theory is behind this:

--10----8--
---8-----8--
---0-----8--
---0-----0--

(G5, Cm/D)

G sounds like the root, and I know I've seen a minor as the IV'th before but I guess I just want someone to explain why and how that works.

thanks.

oh, and the diagram is for the (D, G, B, E) strings
#2
It's G natural minor.

Edit: I should probably explain that better. G natural minor is G A Bb C D Eb F. The IV chord in that key is C. The scale contains Eb, the minor third of C, so C is minor.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jun 11, 2006,
#3
If you're asking about the Cm/D chord it's a Cm because of the notes involved (C,G,Eb) but has a low D as a base note ( I don't know if thats what it's called).
Gibson SG Special Ebony
Epiphone Sheraton w/ Seymour Duncan JB and SH-1 '59
Fender 1985 Made in Japan Stratocaster
Ibanez S470 DXQM Charcoal Brown
Simon Patrick CW Spruce Top Acoustic
#4
Quote by teamzaius
If you're asking about the Cm/D chord it's a Cm because of the notes involved (C,G,Eb) but has a low D as a base note ( I don't know if thats what it's called).


its a Cm chord.. using the bass of D chord..
#5
oh. thanks charlotte. that would make sense. sometimes i overlook the obvious.

i think i was thinking of g5 as gmajor and it kinda threw me off. dumb, i know.
#6
G5 is a powerchord.

the reason it's called G5 is because it's just got the root and 5th of the chord.


G= root

D = 5th


so that chord is just

D --5
G --r
G --r
D --5
x
x