#1
First of I'm not much of a classical player. I heard that Randy Rhoads was classicaly trained. It seemed to help him a lot. Does any one kow any places to learn some classical practices or things like that. Sorry if this is vague but its hard to explain.
Quote by thefoldarsoldar
10
you sir, are funny as hell.



Follower of the Church of Gilmour, PM happytimeharry to join
#2
There's this "quintessential shred masterpiece" called Paganini's Fifth Caprice:" It is what a lot of classical players use to get good. I'd say go for it.
#3
thanks
Quote by thefoldarsoldar
10
you sir, are funny as hell.



Follower of the Church of Gilmour, PM happytimeharry to join
#4
Ew, mentioning the 5th Caprice in this forum is like mentioning Slipknot in the metal forum, no one wants to hear it!

Study some real classical guitarists and their masterpieces, not a classical violin solo that has been raped by modern players.
My God, it's full of stars!
#5
dude the 5th Caprice is a masterpiece in all its wounder....

besides, how do you think classical guitarists got so good? they played piano and violin pieces like paganini and beethoven!!!!!!!

playing those songs builds your chops, its how the classical guitarists got good!!!!!!!


to the thread starter, try "Caprice 24" by paganini , and "Requiem Mass" by Mozart, they really helped me out
Clip, Clop, Clip, Clop, Clip, Clop.....BANG! BANG! BANG!.....clip, clop, clip, clop, clip, clop...

^ Amish Drive-By
#7
It's how classical players got good? LOL! What a HUGE joke. You might want to study and play classical guitar in-depth before you think of making such humorous comments. I'd love to give more detail information on classical guitar but it appears that it probably wouldn't have any effect on some people.
#8
well i've been playing classical guitar for 3 year

and u r right. it improves ur skills tremendously , if u have ne questions feel free to ask me
and i go to a classical teacher in Houston, so if u live there then ur in luck

btwi practice classical for about 2 hours every day now that its the summer

if u wanna learn u got commit

that's why the classical players are good
(my teacher has been playing for 40 years, i'm no where near)

good luck
#9
I don't understand your comments about classical players being good because they had foundations in violin and piano. There are also quite a lot of people who play guitar only but at the same time, they are pretty musically trained. I don't understand how you play classical music and you have great chops.

I may be factually incorrect for the this next segment because I read all this from various sources. So, feel free to challenge me.
The reason why Randy was so good is because he added classical elements into his music. As the minor scales are not frequently being used in music back in the 70s and early 80s, he decided to incorporate the minor scales (especially the E minor scale) into music. Why did he add minor scales? Simply, it was from his classical influence where he got his minor scales from.
However, from another interview, I believe that not only it was his classical influence that played such a big part, it was also his excellent grasp in music theory. He knew a lot about music and which was why he was fluent in his compositions. For instance, he understood what was dissonance and consonance. From a guitar seminar, he explained that he used a dissonance in "diary of a madman" by having an A chord with a flatted E. Thanks to the easy access of internet today, I understand what are dissonance and consonance and what are "diabolus in musica". I mean back then in the 1970s and 1980s, you have to be really musically trained to understand and use these terms.

So if you really want to be that damn good. Practice more classical and read up on more theory. I really think these two can help you to build up musically just like what Randy did.
Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate and hate... leads to the dark side. -Yoda.
#10
If you're just beginning to delve into classical guitar, you should (1) start learning theory, beginning with the major scale, the circle of fifths, all that happy ****, and then (2) find a sheet music store -- not your local Barnes and Noble or guitar shop, but a music store that a classical flutist, pianist, horn player, etc. would go to -- and ask for their opinion on Etudes or other pieces for beginners. Jumping into Paganini or Bach right from the beginning will probably only serve to frustrate you. Remember, you have to put the frame up for a house before you put in the marble fireplace. Another thing to do, especially if you can't yet read music, is to start with the Alfred or Mel Bay guitar series right from the beginning. You'll feel mildly retarded fingerpicking Mary Had a Little Lamb at first, but they steadily increase in difficulty and gets quite challenging by the time you reach level 3/4.
Hi, I'm Peter
#11
Quote by Dirk Gently
If you're just beginning to delve into classical guitar, you should (1) start learning theory, beginning with the major scale, the circle of fifths, all that happy ****, and then (2) find a sheet music store -- not your local Barnes and Noble or guitar shop, but a music store that a classical flutist, pianist, horn player, etc. would go to -- and ask for their opinion on Etudes or other pieces for beginners. Jumping into Paganini or Bach right from the beginning will probably only serve to frustrate you. Remember, you have to put the frame up for a house before you put in the marble fireplace. Another thing to do, especially if you can't yet read music, is to start with the Alfred or Mel Bay guitar series right from the beginning. You'll feel mildly retarded fingerpicking Mary Had a Little Lamb at first, but they steadily increase in difficulty and gets quite challenging by the time you reach level 3/4.


Fun Factoid:

The head of guitar publishing at Alfred (and now Warner Bros.), Aaron Stang, judged my classical solo piece and pop solo piece at a guitar competition
My God, it's full of stars!
#12
Noooo...can I just say
Mel Bay is
the
worst
instruction
series
ever!
Yes, it very much is. I hate it, the very word mel bay makes me shudder. For learning classical guitar, I would recomend you got yourself on amazon, searched "beginers classical guitar," and then what ever you do
dont buy Mel Bay
And that folks is all I have to say on this topic.
#13
Quote by mrbeanconqueror
I don't understand your comments about classical players being good because they had foundations in violin and piano. There are also quite a lot of people who play guitar only but at the same time, they are pretty musically trained. I don't understand how you play classical music and you have great chops.

the person that said that wasn't referring to having a musical background in violin or piano... he/she meant that classical guitarists often play things on classical guitar that were originally composed on violin or piano... which isn't all that different from ANY style guitarist.


Quote by dreadnought
Ew, mentioning the 5th Caprice in this forum is like mentioning Slipknot in the metal forum, no one wants to hear it!

hahaha