#1
Okay I got the pinch harmonic thing down, that is not a problem. I listen to songs like Fire It Up and he does the pinch hamonics on the Low E, No matter how much gain I put on my amp, or what amp model I use, I can not get that sound, even in Drop D, is it easier on Les Pauls like his because of the Shorter Scale?? My guitar is 25.5" so I just need to figureout how to do those. Any Ideas?
#2
Try pinching in different spots. I do it between my neck and middle pickups, so you should do it at the treble side of your neck humbucker.
#3
i'm not sure exactly where abouts to direct you, but it took me a while to get when i started messing with them but its just finding where's best on ur particular guitar, because the lengths do vary slightly and there are other factors which effect where to 'pinch'. Really the best advice i can give you is to just keep experimenting. You're setup is defo capable of it, no doubt there, so just keep messing, its also more fun that way... and you'll use them constantly when yo get them trust me. Good luck
#4
its easier with hot pickups. its not the scale cause i can do pinch harmonics just as easy on my friends ZakkWylde Les Paul and i can on my 82 Ibanez flying V. Its just more about the pickups and distortion.
#5
Yea... pick up will do that. I find that if I tilt my pick a little bit more, almost like dragging the side on the string fast, it'll squeel. Try it.
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#6
Quote by danilo19
its easier with hot pickups. its not the scale cause i can do pinch harmonics just as easy on my friends ZakkWylde Les Paul and i can on my 82 Ibanez flying V. Its just more about the pickups and distortion.


No, it's about harmonic nodes...where on the string you can produce the harmonics and with the 6th and fattest string, I find that a lot of thumb is needed to produce the pinch harmonics, also to the guy that says "they are different lengths in different places" you need to understand that Pinch Harmonics have pitches too...if the pitch isn't within the key your song is in it might sound a little out of place, volume helps too!

Hope that helped
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#7
Quote by La Qotsa
No, it's about harmonic nodes...where on the string you can produce the harmonics and with the 6th and fattest string, I find that a lot of thumb is needed to produce the pinch harmonics, also to the guy that says "they are different lengths in different places" you need to understand that Pinch Harmonics have pitches too...if the pitch isn't within the key your song is in it might sound a little out of place, volume helps too!

Hope that helped

I pretty much agree with that... try different spots on your string to produce the harmonics, that can make a big difference. Also, a harmonic on the low E may also require more force. Try that too.
#8
Thamks Guys, oh yeah


Quote by danilo19
its easier with hot pickups. its not the scale cause i can do pinch harmonics just as easy on my friends ZakkWylde Les Paul and i can on my 82 Ibanez flying V. Its just more about the pickups and distortion.


Damilo19 look at my Sig, I have EMG's in my guitar (81/85), which is about as hot as you get and I have modeling amp where I set the amp to Numetal, scoop the mids, crank everythng else up and add a little reverb. So its not my set up, and oh yeah Im pretty sure most people can do it on acoustics or unplugged electrics because I can, but they just aren't as lound (Higher strings)
#9
here's my 2 cents from my own experience. pickup's and scale length mean nothing when trying a p.h. i find it's more about technique than anything else, and of course finding the "sweet spot" on the string where you get the squeals. that being said, i think it's important to have a strong grasp of harmonics on the other strings before trying them on the low E. at least thats how it was for me, they are harder at first to do on the low E, but once you get them, it's just like doing them anywhere else.

also, i found that practicing them on my acoustic helped a lot, because you need proper technique to hear them on an acoustic.
#10
Quote by headfest88
here's my 2 cents from my own experience. pickup's and scale length mean nothing when trying a p.h. i find it's more about technique than anything else, and of course finding the "sweet spot" on the string where you get the squeals. that being said, i think it's important to have a strong grasp of harmonics on the other strings before trying them on the low E. at least thats how it was for me, they are harder at first to do on the low E, but once you get them, it's just like doing them anywhere else.

also, i found that practicing them on my acoustic helped a lot, because you need proper technique to hear them on an acoustic.


agreed

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#11
From own experience:

1. Find the 3rd fret (any string but especially the low E) and try and stay just where the inlay starts

2. Dont push down

3. Pick the note with your finger resting upon the string (not pinch harmonic)

4. After picking push the string down and fret it on 3rd and vibrato it

That's what I call the Zakk Wylde effect. Once you master this you can play songs like Counterfeit God and Fire it Up...
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