#1
ok, I've masterd these chords: G, C, D, F, E, B, AM, A7, A, C7, G7 and I can play a few songs like a part of wildwood flower, blackberry blossum, pretty fly for a white guy, house of the rising sun, in the pines, alot of standards such as amazing grace, banks of ohio, and a few more songs and a couple of things. I've been playing for around 5months now, should I be ahead more or am I doing fine? I can read tabs somwhat but have troubles jumping around the fret board and doing slides and such, so any help and advice would be great. I like to learn new songs and stuff but I don't want nothing to hard, just a basic of what I should work on would be most nice. thanks.
let your feet get swept away by the winds of Autumn.
#2
I think you are doing fine. It all really boils down to how much your practice.

Can you transition to each chord perfectly? Can you play notes cleanly and accurately? Work on those if you can't
#3
Quote by Autumn Children
ok, I've masterd these chords: G, C, D, F, E, B, AM, A7, A, C7, G7 and I can play a few songs like a part of wildwood flower, blackberry blossum, pretty fly for a white guy, house of the rising sun, in the pines, alot of standards such as amazing grace, banks of ohio, and a few more songs and a couple of things. I've been playing for around 5months now, should I be ahead more or am I doing fine? I can read tabs somwhat but have troubles jumping around the fret board and doing slides and such, so any help and advice would be great. I like to learn new songs and stuff but I don't want nothing to hard, just a basic of what I should work on would be most nice. thanks.


Depends on what your goal is. If it is to play lead, start learning some easy riffs/solos. But regardless, just learning chords will help build the coordination between your left and right hand which has probably never been used up to this point to such an extent and complexity. Just make sure if you continue practicing rhythm for a while that you don't just play the chords in the tabs without listening to the song; it's an easy habit to fall into. Listen to the strumming pattern and the timing and get it right. Otherwise you'll find yourself falling into the same strumming pattern with every song you play and when you go to compose music you'll have less of a base to go off of. And if your goal IS to be a rhythm guitarist, start expanding your chord library. Don't be one of those guys that never learn barre chords and any derivitives thereof. Some of my favorite songs use chords like Bb and Eb etc because they're nontraditional. After a while the same old open chords rehashed over and over will diminish your interest for playing. You sound like you're doing fine (although no way saying for sure unless we hear you play) but nows the time to step it up and break away from the average campfire guitarist to a bona fide guitar hero.

Bry
#4
The quantity, even quality, of songs, does not really tell us what level you are up to. YOu should be asking yourself how well you know your guitar and the theory you know etc. Playing other people's stuff has a lot less to do with your skill than these other things.
#5
Quote by Autumn Children
I like to learn new songs and stuff but I don't want nothing to hard, just a basic of what I should work on would be most nice. thanks.


Dude, I have been playing 2 years or so, and if there's one thing I've learned, you ain't gonna get anywhere if you don't push yourself. You'll just reach a plataeu, get stuck, and be like, "How the hell do I move on?". Trust me, I've been there, and so have most here. The only way to increase your abilities is to challenge them.
#6
I'm a little ahead of you, but probably only because I take lessons. I can tell you what I do and see if that helps: for every practice session, I divide it in two parts. For the first half, I try and concentrate on chord melody or note theory (try not to go too chord crazy llike I did when I started--chords are essential, but it's always better to be well rounded) then I spend the last half of my practice session either learning new songs, or ironing out the little problems that I have with the ones I can already pretty much play.

Try and pick songs that will teach you something if you can. I picked Driver Eight for my last song because of all the changes in the strumming pattern and the fact that it has some nice arpeggios throughout. I learned Babylon because I thought it would be nice to get to know some finger picking. I'm trying to learn Life by the Drop now because I love the blues, and I'd like to get a feel for that typical shuffle pattern while also learning some little embellishments you can throw in to keep it interesting.

Just stuff like that. Do what you like, but try and make sure that you'll be moving forward as a result of the path you take. Best of luck to you.
Quote by chipsahoy
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