#1
what do heavier strings do opposed to lighter ones? what is the sound difference?
#3
also, if you have heavier strings, you're gonna have to string them a bit tighter to get in tune
#4
The feel is much chunkier and not as easy to bend/play like .09's or something. Tone is fatter.

Not recommended with floating bridges, but if you have a tremol-no or something. . .
#5
It adds definition. You can tune lower.

Right now im playing a .11-.70 set and it sounds awsome.
#6
Yea, all my guitars came stock with .09's . I now restrung 'em all with .11's for drop C tuning. It makes it easier in a way to get all the strings when moving with fast riffs. To me anyways...
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#7
i always re-string my guitars with 10-46s. they play just like 9-42s IMO, and sound far better
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#8
whoever said they used 11-70s...thats insane, my high g on my bass is only a .52......

and generally you would only use them for drop tunings. most standard tuned players will use a standard .09-.10
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#9
Quote by TheFluffy
It adds definition. You can tune lower.

Right now im playing a .11-.70 set and it sounds awsome.


damn those are some thick string. what tuning do you use? thickest strings ive used were 13-56's in drop C
#10
Quote by Mascot


Not recommended with floating bridges, but if you have a tremol-no or something. . .



I have 10-52's on my Ibanez Rg 570 with a floating trem and tune to standard (EADGBE) The only thing is, is that you have to adjust the spring tension and posibly the neck. I highly recomend doing it on floating trem guitars.....
#11
Quote by Evan50150
whoever said they used 11-70s...thats insane, my high g on my bass is only a .52......

and generally you would only use them for drop tunings. most standard tuned players will use a standard .09-.10


yeah i know 11-70s? why? i could understand it if you had a baritone guitar but DAMN.
#12
Quote by Blinded0n1sidE
yeah i know 11-70s? why? i could understand it if you had a baritone guitar but DAMN.

String some up sometime.

Im actually normally in open d.

The tightness you get from them is amazing, so chunky and full.

It really adds to the sound. I play stuff like The Acacia Strain so they are perfect.
#14
11-70, isnt that the same guage that Mike Mushock from Staind uses on his sig baritone, the one with the 28" scale length? and isnt it in like drop Ab tuning? and you use those for open D? i agree with Blinded0n1sidE, how does you neck not snape? what guitar do you use?
#15
Quote by Blinded0n1sidE
^ lol nah.

I'd prefer to keep my neck all in one piece thanks.


Lawl.

Its a Gibson SG Voodoo

I went from regualr .10s to these without needs a truss rod adjust, crazy, huh.

Ive tuned it up to standard E also, with no neck warping at all.
#16
I use 12's or 13's in standard. Makes it sound much fuller and nicer.
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#17
Quote by TheFluffy
Lawl.

Its a Gibson SG Voodoo

I went from regualr .10s to these without needs a truss rod adjust, crazy, huh.

Ive tuned it up to standard E also, with no neck warping at all.


O.o
damn that thing must be built like a tank to go up to standard with 11-70's with out any adjustments or neck warpage.
#18
Quote by lp_dude_2
O.o
damn that thing must be built like a tank to go up to standard with 11-70's with out any adjustments or neck warpage.

Actually, i lied. I just looked and there is a tiny bit of bend in it.
#19
Quote by TheFluffy
Actually, i lied. I just looked and there is a tiny bit of bend in it.


still, a tinny bit of bending isnt much comparied to snapping your neck or totally warping it into the shape of a pretizle
#21
Quote by TheFluffy
:P

Go out and get some huge strings..they sound awsome.


oh i know, i used to have 13-56's on my SZ, but it was in drop C. but it still had that great huge full tone. but when it came time to change strings i bought a set of 11-49's and tuned my SZ to standard. but its getting to be time to change strings and im defentally going back to the 13's in drop C.
#22
the neck on your guitar is supposed to have a little bit of a bend or a bow. like if you push down a string on the 1st and last (24th usually) fret, if your guitar is set up correctly, you'll notice the bent at about the 7th fret.

but that bend changes with string tension, and tension changes with string gauge. I guess as long as you adjust your neck accordingly you can throw anything on there....

i mean hey, the singer/bassist for the Prestidents of the USA plays a Gibson SG guitar with 2 bass strings on it! lol
#23
Quote by Blinded0n1sidE
i mean hey, the singer/bassist for the Prestidents of the USA plays a Gibson SG guitar with 2 bass strings on it! lol


hell yes i love that band. not many people know of them. that was actually the band to get me into listening to music in the first place.
#24
Heavier gauges (.011's - .013's) give you afull, fat, glassy tone. They are harder to play, but you get used to it. It's worth it for the tone, especially if you play blues or jazz. (and rock)

For shred, metal, and reggae alot of people prefer small guage strings. (.009's - .010's) for playabilty and tone. It does thin out your tone, but it's alot easier to play. (I guess some people like a thin scratchy tone for reggae or funk.)

I usually play with .011's, .010's are good compromise between tone and playability. I might go down to .009's soon though, just to play some more Satch kinda stuff. Will suck for blues though...

Play all the guages from .009's to .012's (in standard tuning) and see which you like the otne of best. Remember that if you struggle toplay on the strings your tone wil suffer, even though someone used to the guage will sound better on them.
"You can practice to attain knowledge, but you can't practice to attain wisdom." - Herbie Hancock
#25
If you learn to shred on .012s or .013s for like 2 years, then when you have reached your limit in shredding skills and have hit pro status, replace them with thinner strings like .010s, you will just faint in how strong your fingers are and you can shred like a crazy guy.

Learn to shred from heavy strings, then do light strings, its like magic.
#26
Quote by Invictious
If you learn to shred on .012s or .013s for like 2 years, then when you have reached your limit in shredding skills and have hit pro status, replace them with thinner strings like .010s, you will just faint in how strong your fingers are and you can shred like a crazy guy.

Learn to shred from heavy strings, then do light strings, its like magic.


Or just play a lot of acoustic guitar
#27
It's a bastard if you are used to soloing with .09s and then goin to .11s. It's easy for me and some but if you're new to heavier strings, it's best to bend the strings to hell and highwater to loosen the strings a bit (even though you should do it to all size strings)

Andy
#28
I use Ernie Ball (regular-10-42) and i like them the best, but i was using the super slink string and didn't like the sound. So heavier strings are deffinantly better in sound, but for playability, but if you can play heavier strings it doesn't matter?
#29
Im a 10 man myslef

thats all my fingers can take
Tears in waves, minds on fire
Nights alone by your side
#30
Using Slinkies to develop finger strength is not a good idea, they are just too slinky.

Death to EB!! Besides the skinny top heavy bottom series.