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#1
What are some mistakes..styles of playing..habits.. that new players usually make so I don't make them?

Do you think it's important to go through rythem and chord training before you try to play songs/play lead stuff?
#2
Some people would arge that since scales and chord progressions are the basis for most lead work, then you should learn them first yeah.

Personally, I think you should learn songs that you personally want to play as well as learning chords and scales; it'll inspire you to play more when you can play along to your favourite track. Start off easy, practice lots and don't give up.
Love is not a victory march.
#3
Quote by amazingdm


Do you think it's important to go through rythem and chord training before you try to play songs/play lead stuff?



Definatly... Rhythm is everyhting with guitar playing. I mean you do not hear Slash, Zakk Wylde, Clapton etc playing with sloppy rhythm.

Also start off doing chromatics in order to get good dexterity early. Also pinpoint discomforts (eg like sore hands) and look for ways to stop them so that you dont end up with bouts of RSI down the track.

PS Always practice with a metronome and do not get cut up if you cant play fast at first, as the cliche says: "you gotta learn to crawl before you can walk" Playing well takes years.

Hope this helps
#5
Quote by fireball85
Whats a chromatic?



chromatics is the frets in order... like 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8. most people practice chromatic scales (1-2-3-4) for speed.


What are some mistakes..styles of playing..habits.. that new players usually make so I don't make them?


1)learn to use your pinky early rather than waiting

2)learn alternate picking
#6
one mistake i see almost every beginner make is the way they hold the pick. they hold it closer to the fat part of it, which makes it much more difficult to pick. hole the pick closer to the tip, so only about 2-3 mm sticks out and you'll have much more control.

tension is also another thing most beginners struggle with. their arm(s) usually tense up, particularly the picking arm, and they tend to pick with their entire arm. your hands arms, shoulders, and everything else show be relaxed when playing, it will make things much easier in the long run.

one last thing that really annoys me. i have many friends who always ask me to teach them guitar. so i try, but they never stick with it. i think a lot of people think it will be eaiser than it is. to that i say, dont get down on yourself if you struggle a lot at first, it takes time to progress, and you have to put in the hours of work needed to advance your playing.
#7
1. Not using all four fingers
2. Not alternate picking
3. Not playing with a pick when nessicary
4. Letting notes ring when they shouldn't be
5. Playing the with the same strumming pattern for every song instead of listening to the long itself.
6. Learning the intro to a song then moving on to another one.
7. Continuing to learn songs that are well within their skill level instead of advancing.
8. Not playing anything by ear.

That's all I can think of right now

Bry
#8
I used to make quite a few mistakes as a beginner. One of the worst was bending strings with one finger. Its best to try and always use three fingers to bend, my fingers were torn to shreds.

Also, hitting extra strings needs to be clamped down on. I used to think nothing of it, but you soon learn that you sound inconsistent and bad from doing that.

It is important to keep the fingers arched and clear of the strings to let chords ring out properly. I see lots of begginers letting their fingers bend flat against the fretboard, then they wonder why the higher strings are getting muted.

Those are just a few, but there are plenty more, such as holding the pick wrongly, letting strings get out of tune, letting notes ring that shouldn't etc...
#9
I'm surprised some people don't like to use the pinky.. I've been sorta trying to make sure I only use it when I need to that way I don't get spoiled by it..
#10
Alternate picking is very usefull.
Last edited by Rocu at Jun 13, 2006,
#11
You mean like up/down strokes?

And

TRUE/FALSE

It's better to learn (with your left hand) finger positioning/playing by touch/sound instead of looking directly at your left hand.. and instead focusing on your right hand that's picking?

I see a lot of new players looking at their left hand.. but from what I've learned from typing is that adds an extra step and slows ya down
#12
dont play like i play:
useing the thumb instead of a pick
pluck around the 22 fret
pluck only down and not up
never use the pinky
never look at anything but tabs.

yeah trying to use alternative picking (up and down plucking) and picking in the middle and using pinky is like learning all over again.. oh yeah i think if you can make it so you hand can rememebr 3 5 7 9 12 without looking then your in.
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Last edited by louman61 at Jun 13, 2006,
#14
Key importance to being a great rhythm player: Use a metronome.
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#15
Quote by amazingdm
You mean like up/down strokes?

And

TRUE/FALSE

It's better to learn (with your left hand) finger positioning/playing by touch/sound instead of looking directly at your left hand.. and instead focusing on your right hand that's picking?

I see a lot of new players looking at their left hand.. but from what I've learned from typing is that adds an extra step and slows ya down


What I did was that I used to sit and play infront of a mirror, worked good for me.
And yes, up/down strokes, learn it from the start.

Edit: and like above said, use a metronome.
#16
most starting guitarists will try too hard stuff too early. i mean its good to challenge yourself but its pathetic when these kids are like, "dude, i learned the solo to crazy train" and it doesnt even sound like the solo, just some weird random ****.
and probably the worst mistake is that they get themselves ripped off by ****ty equipment
#17
Top 5 Big Mistakes, in my opinion.

1. Not using a metronome This is major! Everyone who plays music should practice with a metronome. Live, the metronome is called a drummer (insert rimshot).
2. Using only downstrokes. Seriously, just start with alternate picking. You'll thank me later.
3. Anchoring one or more fingers on a part of the guitar, usually the pickguard
4. No ear training. Learn to know that low E string. Sing it, hum it, pluck it at random times in the day until it gets stuck in your head.
5. Tuning with an electronic tuner all the time. Sure electronic tuners are great, but you should learn to tune by ear and then use the electronic tuner to correct your mistakes.
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"'What do you do when you've seen the most stupendous, stunning, earth-shattering show of all time?' Uh...I dunno...stop using hyperbole?"


UG 83
#18
Looking at this I used to make quite a few of those mistakes, but i managed to correct most of them after about a month of playing. Seems like ages ago but ive only been playing 6 months and if i tried playing how i used to, it would be so hard and sloppy compared to now.
#19
ive been playing for 4 years and i dont even know what alternate picking is
#20
I've only been playing a few weeks and I think (mainly by reading lessons and articals on here) I've managed to avoid most of the most common mistakes begginers make apart from maybe learning the intro to a song getting fed up and moving onto another. I find it difficult to get the correct strumming patterns and although I can play all the chords it just ends up sounding crap!!

I'm sticking with it tho
#21
Learning alternatepicking from the beginning is the most usefull tip there is.
#22
Quote by auranos
Top 5 Big Mistakes, in my opinion.

1. Not using a metronome This is major! Everyone who plays music should practice with a metronome. Live, the metronome is called a drummer (insert rimshot).
2. Using only downstrokes. Seriously, just start with alternate picking. You'll thank me later.
3. Anchoring one or more fingers on a part of the guitar, usually the pickguard
4. No ear training. Learn to know that low E string. Sing it, hum it, pluck it at random times in the day until it gets stuck in your head.
5. Tuning with an electronic tuner all the time. Sure electronic tuners are great, but you should learn to tune by ear and then use the electronic tuner to correct your mistakes.



Top tips, thanks
#23
this is gonna sound really stupid but when I was just starting out (Had no teacher, not even a book to practice with) I would only use one finger to play. Anyone else made that mistake?
Dickless.
#25
Quote by MetalMilitia212
this is gonna sound really stupid but when I was just starting out (Had no teacher, not even a book to practice with) I would only use one finger to play. Anyone else made that mistake?


Yepo, for about 20 minutes, but as I thought back to the videos I had seen on Kerrang, I realised there had to be more to it...
#26
I've made all of these mistakes when I was a beginner. No wonder I'm so horrible at guitar now.

One mistake alot of people make is that when playing notes/lead that they have there fingers way above the strings, If your fingers are hoving directly over the string you can play much faster.
#27
When I first started bass my bad habit was I didnt keep my thumb on the back of the neck, so I couldnt stretch my fingers out into first position easily. After I fixed that, I could play frets 1-4 without shifting
#28
Quote by Bryan52803
1. Not using all four fingers
2. Not alternate picking
3. Not playing with a pick when nessicary
4. Letting notes ring when they shouldn't be
5. Playing the with the same strumming pattern for every song instead of listening to the long itself.
6. Learning the intro to a song then moving on to another one.
7. Continuing to learn songs that are well within their skill level instead of advancing.
8. Not playing anything by ear.

That's all I can think of right now

Bry

actually only using down stroking or only using up strokes for exercises is a great way to increase speed.
#29
Um no.......it might seem like it at first but alt picking will increase your speed more in the long run.
All Hail! The Kala-Kala Chieftain!
#30
Quote by Guitar_junkie
actually only using down stroking or only using up strokes for exercises is a great way to increase speed.


Not for single notes. For strumming using only up or down strokes very slowly is a good way to strengthen your strumming and see mistakes in your technique, though.

Quote by slybeans
Top tips, thanks


You're welcome!
Quote by John Mayer
"'What do you do when you've seen the most stupendous, stunning, earth-shattering show of all time?' Uh...I dunno...stop using hyperbole?"


UG 83
#31
Tip for new guitarists: never, ever anchor.

Anchoring, in most cases, is either resting your wrist on the bridge or resting one of your fingers (usually the pinky) on the guitar. This is not only bad for your speed, it also builds up tension in your wrist, which can lead to serious injury.

There's a gigantic thread about this in the Musician's Talk forum.
#33
Quote by Scourge441
Tip for new guitarists: never, ever anchor.

Anchoring, in most cases, is either resting your wrist on the bridge or resting one of your fingers (usually the pinky) on the guitar. This is not only bad for your speed, it also builds up tension in your wrist, which can lead to serious injury.

There's a gigantic thread about this in the Musician's Talk forum.


So where does your picking hand go then, do you just hover it over the bridge of the guitar?
#34
Quote by MainEvent
So where does your picking hand go then, do you just hover it over the bridge of the guitar?


Check this thread out: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=339913&highlight=anchoring
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He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#35
well, my biggest problem was playing with an amplifyer. i'd always fiddle around with all the knobs, and usually end up playing something that sounded like garbage with the distortion on... i still like to mess around making up little riffs, but when it does come to a certain song, now i leave the settings alone, close to how the original guitar in the song sounds. am i the only one that used to do this?
#36
I've been playing with my pinky on the pick guard and my hand hasn't hurt, and yesterday I tried playing without my pinky on the pick guard and I didn't play any faster.
#37
^That's because you're not used to it... You can't expect to immediately see results!

Again, read the thread I mentioned above...

*Prays you have the attention span*
He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt.
He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice.


Remember: A prudent question is one half of wisdom.

Click.
#38
i'd say not learning basic music reading skills. reading music will help you immensely.

also, something that i wish i had done when i first started learning was talking with other guitarists about the guitar. not like on UG but in actual person. this will also help a great deal, both in technical ability and in inspiration. i find when i talk to guitarists about guitar i usually come away a little bit mor inspired to play well.
#39
Quote by Resiliance
^That's because you're not used to it... You can't expect to immediately see results!

Again, read the thread I mentioned above...

*Prays you have the attention span*


I read it until everyone started arguing. I think it's more a thing of preference.
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