#1
i was wondering if this was a good practicing method for shred guitar and speed buildup
should i start out at a slow pace on the metronome and work on lots of scales ascending and descending and then every week work up 10 bpm, or is this too fast to work up, and also what are some really good scales that i could work with, and to become a good shred guitarist what should you spend most time with scales or practicing songs, im not really sure help a brotha out
#4
I agree with JP's Rock Discipline, possibly the best guitar instructional video ever.

If you can't get a hold of it, here's what you do:
1) Check out the lessons related to your topic on this site.
2) Yes! Use a metronome. Work on 4 finger chromatics at 40bpm 4/4 timing. Once you can play it perfectly clean at that speed, increase bpm by 8. Once you've got that perfectly clean, increase by 8 once again. Make sure you don't advance any further than you're supposed to otherwise you'll be a sloppy player.

Besides the 4 finger chromatic, you can also try the 3 finger. Or if you wish, any other scales.
#5
Hmmm, here's my version of getting at faster speed. Set ur metronome to lets say, 40 or 50 nps. And at the interval of the beat, try to incorporate a lick, either that you make or you found or anything, but the key is to loop it. For example, you have a lick that have 4 notes in em and when you reverse it, it'll make it 8 notes and when you incorporate that in the interval of the metronome's beat, you will have a 8 notes per beat lick. You can do 4, 6, 16, and so forth but start slow, eventually getting it fast at faster tempo. -also with the proper beat.

It also helps if you do kinda like a jumpy or accelerate a little. All of this are explained more detailed in the JP's Rock Dicipline, so check it out.
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#6
Troy Stetina's Speed Methodics is a GREAT book, and yes for Petrucci's Rock Discipline.
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#7
Yes, Speed Mechanics is a good book.
To make all your exercises even MORE efficient you should also get Guitar Principles.

Your method of starting slow on ascending & descending scales and going up
10 BPM per week is not very good.

There's WAY more things you need to be able to do with your fingers than that
will practice. Plus, you'll eventually hit a BPM wall beyond which you can't go
because you do almost 0 focus on technique.

Practicing songs is NOT a good way to work technique. Getting rapid improvement
in technique requires you focus on very specific exercises that narrowly address
a specific technique or two and doing a lot of that.
#8
Don't forget to put your soul into it. Just open it up when you play and let it flow. Otherwise you'll sound like Herman Li. *shudder*

But seriously, DON'T BE AFRAID OF USING THE MAJOR SCALES. They are excellent. Try playing some classical music as well.
what happened to the proposed Kirk Hammett flamenco album?


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#9
Quote by Doubleday
Don't forget to put your soul into it. Just open it up when you play and let it flow. Otherwise you'll sound like Herman Li. *shudder*

But seriously, DON'T BE AFRAID OF USING THE MAJOR SCALES. They are excellent. Try playing some classical music as well.


Um, you are confusing PLAYing with PRACTICEing.

Before you can put your soul into it, you have to train your mind & body to do what you want.
#10
But if you never put your soul into practicing, it'll get all weak and shriveled up and won't be any good when you go to play. Just like Herman Li. Using your soul in shred is just as important as using your body.

And what's practicing but playing music you don't want to play?
what happened to the proposed Kirk Hammett flamenco album?


His acoustic didn't sound good with wah pedal, I suppose.
#11
Quote by edg
Yes, Speed Mechanics is a good book.
To make all your exercises even MORE efficient you should also get Guitar Principles.

Your method of starting slow on ascending & descending scales and going up
10 BPM per week is not very good.

There's WAY more things you need to be able to do with your fingers than that
will practice. Plus, you'll eventually hit a BPM wall beyond which you can't go
because you do almost 0 focus on technique.

Practicing songs is NOT a good way to work technique. Getting rapid improvement
in technique requires you focus on very specific exercises that narrowly address
a specific technique or two and doing a lot of that.


By technique do you mean things such as proper wrist/hand movements, adjascent string muting, proper pick holding, etc. Or do you mean guitar tricks such as hammer ons/pull offs, tapping, bending, pinch harmonics, etc.?

if it's the former, wouldn't scales be perfect for practicing technique? Please explain.
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#12
kinda confused? i already have a pretty decent background with the guitar, im just looking for speed exercizes in order to shred a lot faster and a good way to go about it, without getting some dvd, im sure its good but theres gotta be something good on the net
#13
Quote by Doubleday
But if you never put your soul into practicing, it'll get all weak and shriveled up and won't be any good when you go to play. Just like Herman Li. Using your soul in shred is just as important as using your body.

And what's practicing but playing music you don't want to play?

Herman Li uses his soul, apparently his soul = old cartridge game (SNES) when they got stuck, u know, that sound it produces if you pull the cartridge out during game...

To TS, probably there are, but thats pretty much it, looping a lick so that you can play it on a metronome. It'd just be easier if you have visual guide actually so you know what you are doing. So, DVD is better.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
Last edited by madpickin03 at Jun 13, 2006,
#14
Yeah, you do need to practice playing too. But most people don't have a
problem with that.

Anyone can pick up a guitar and put a lot of soul into playing 1 note. That gets
old pretty quick and isn't very satisfying.

The better your body is trained, the more outlets for expression your soul has.
That's much more satisfying.
#15
Quote by Bazilisck311
By technique do you mean things such as proper wrist/hand movements, adjascent string muting, proper pick holding, etc. Or do you mean guitar tricks such as hammer ons/pull offs, tapping, bending, pinch harmonics, etc.?

if it's the former, wouldn't scales be perfect for practicing technique? Please explain.


See, when people think scales they automatically think straight up and down.
Scales are absolutely great. Most exercises I do are with a scale, but going
straight up & down is a very very small part of how I practice.

I'm talking about ways to use a scale to focus on very specific things. Like
inside picking, outside picking, finger rolls, cross picking, sweeps, long stretches,
single string up & down. Basically any way you can think of that you may want
to use in a solo. There's some things that are pretty damn hard to pull off fast
unless you've trained your fingers ahead of time and then there's a lot of things
you wouldn't even begin to think of doing off-the-cuff without having practiced
it first.

If you just practice a scale straight up and down and wonder why when you try
and solo it sounds like playing a scale up & down, well.... that's what you've
been practicing!
#16
Quote by edg
See, when people think scales they automatically think straight up and down.
Scales are absolutely great. Most exercises I do are with a scale, but going
straight up & down is a very very small part of how I practice.

I'm talking about ways to use a scale to focus on very specific things. Like
inside picking, outside picking, finger rolls, cross picking, sweeps, long stretches,
single string up & down. Basically any way you can think of that you may want
to use in a solo. There's some things that are pretty damn hard to pull off fast
unless you've trained your fingers ahead of time and then there's a lot of things
you wouldn't even begin to think of doing off-the-cuff without having practiced
it first.

If you just practice a scale straight up and down and wonder why when you try
and solo it sounds like playing a scale up & down, well.... that's what you've
been practicing!


Good point - I've discovered this as well and hence why I include many different things in my scale runs. An example would be tapping a few notes in a blues scale or skipping every other string (forces you to memorize vividly the scale as well)
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#17
Quote by ias05
kinda confused? i already have a pretty decent background with the guitar, im just looking for speed exercizes in order to shred a lot faster and a good way to go about it, without getting some dvd, im sure its good but theres gotta be something good on the net


Check this out. I'm not sure if this is the whole DVD but I found that a little while ago.
#18
Hey edg, from what I can remember, there are 12 major scales.

But, what the hell are the Diatonic Major Scales? Are these the same 12 Major Scales found on the Circle of Fifths with just a fancy name slapped on them meaning seven notes?

See them for yourself:

http://www.powertabs.net/tablature.php?id=8858
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#19
See, when people think scales they automatically think straight up and down.
Scales are absolutely great. Most exercises I do are with a scale, but going
straight up & down is a very very small part of how I practice.

I'm talking about ways to use a scale to focus on very specific things. Like
inside picking, outside picking, finger rolls, cross picking, sweeps, long stretches,
single string up & down. Basically any way you can think of that you may want
to use in a solo. There's some things that are pretty damn hard to pull off fast
unless you've trained your fingers ahead of time and then there's a lot of things
you wouldn't even begin to think of doing off-the-cuff without having practiced
it first.

If you just practice a scale straight up and down and wonder why when you try
and solo it sounds like playing a scale up & down, well.... that's what you've
been practicing!


Those are some words of wisdom right there. Take heed of them.
#20
Quote by Turbo_Man
Check this out. I'm not sure if this is the whole DVD but I found that a little while ago.


Thanks for that mate, dunno if its the whole thing either, jus started watching and its good.

One of the warm up exercises made me realise ive overworked a muscle in a sort of tight unrelaxed way when i was doing some riffs earlier. I'm really gonna take note of these warm ups as I have been hurting myself a little lately, not that I'm a pro or anything, but its important to warm up, I can tell already!
#21
Quote by PunishedOne
Hey edg, from what I can remember, there are 12 major scales.

But, what the hell are the Diatonic Major Scales? Are these the same 12 Major Scales found on the Circle of Fifths with just a fancy name slapped on them meaning seven notes?

See them for yourself:

http://www.powertabs.net/tablature.php?id=8858


If a scale is "Diatonic" it is a 7-note scale based off of what you would call
the "Major" scale. So, yeah, it would be the Major scale keys found in the
circle of fifths. But, it also includes all the modal scales based on the major scale
of which there are 7. For instance the Dorian scale is also Diatonic.

If anyone wants a really good workout on scales, one's that really target
doing specific techniques and useful solo material, I highly recommend
Sheets Of Sound (google it). It's not easy stuff and you should already know your
major scale in all positions up & down the fretboard.