#1
i dont know if im mentally incapable of doing this. But my gutiar teacher gave me two cds, of blues back tracks to learn how to solo over them with major and minor pentatonics and im now getting into doing whole tones diminished and modes. i feel liek when im trying to solo over these its just a bunch of random notes coming out basically just repetitive licks and what not i now a tun of licks and runs but idk it feels so random just imprioving even tho i know its to teach me to get better at improviseing shouldnt soloing over these tracks feel more then just random blues licks that just happen to be in key?
#2
It takes practice, my man... practice. It takes time to wrap your mind around what your ears are taking in... and time to get down the feel of what your hands are doing. TIME.

And spellcheck.
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#3
yeah sorry i type fast lol. yeah i have been working at this for abotu a month now and it seems i have better days then others. thanks for the reply
#4
Just keep practicing, phrasing licks is something that comes from practicing.

Listen to some old blues if you want, that will give you some ideas.
#5
Try transcribing some classic solos, these will help you see how the masters form their solos and help you get an idea of what tools to use and how to use them.
#6
my guitar teacher was smart, he said to start with just the notes on the B and E strings from the pentatonic scale. then just play around with those and get a feel for how it sounds if you hold one longer than another, or play one on a certain chord change, then gradually add more notes. also, know where the root notes are (for an A blues scale, fret 5 on the 6th string, 7 on the 4th, and 5th on the first, all are the note A in different octaves) experiment with landing licks on these notes, and hitting them especially when you return to the I chord. Aiming for the root notes gives a lick a finality. aim for this finality at first, then play around with different ways of reaching it or avoiding it for more tension. you should also end your solos on root notes for now so you can develop an ear for them as your "tonal center". solos should suggest a tonal center, but deviate from it in interesting ways.
#7
try playing the chord tones over the jam track a few times,

then once you've got those cemented into your skull, try using the mixolydian of each chord.
#8
^that's a good idea, the chord tones (notes contained within each chord). play those and try to incorporate notes from the pentatonic scale too
#9
the Dorian mode works with blues
Quote by Jimi Hendrix
The Blues Is Easy To Play But Hard To Feel.

Quote by Chris Impellitteri
I Promise That My Solos Will Only Get Faster.
[Practice Makes Perfect][Hell Yeah]
#10
Everything works over blues, lol
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#11
i could be wrong .. but i'm pretty sure if you are playing a 145 progression like C F G... use the relative minor pentatonic scale. when you're playing C play the pentatonic that starts on A .. the fifth fret. for F you'd play D pentatonic minor.. and G would be be E.

try it out and see how it sounds. i know it works with a harmonica.
#12
Quote by scheck006
try playing the chord tones over the jam track a few times,

then once you've got those cemented into your skull, try using the mixolydian of each chord.


That's the way my jazz teacher taught blues soloing. It's a pretty good way to start: begin on safe chord tones, then gradually work other notes in.


The way I learned blues-rock soloing was just a.) listening to a lot of it, and even more importantly b.) learning a lot of the solos by guys I like. I started getting a feel for the music: good places for my lines to go, how to use repeated ideas... basically, it gave me a better sense of direction, instead of just playing random notes.
#13
+1 To the chord tone Stuff.

Also, try stretching out and doing long intervals and thnking of different triads over the chords.
#14
Quote by psychodelia
That's the way my jazz teacher taught blues soloing. It's a pretty good way to start: begin on safe chord tones, then gradually work other notes in.


The way I learned blues-rock soloing was just a.) listening to a lot of it, and even more importantly b.) learning a lot of the solos by guys I like. I started getting a feel for the music: good places for my lines to go, how to use repeated ideas... basically, it gave me a better sense of direction, instead of just playing random notes.


oh yea, and some of the greats you're just amazed at how they rip apart such a simple form.

ever tried transcribing a coltrane or charlie parker solo over a blues?