#1
I want to write a song with harmonized guitar in the begining. The rythym player is gonna play the main part (probably the lower part), and I'm gonna play the harmonized part (higher part). How many steps up do I go up from his part to get a good sounding harmony?
Quote by triple_X_maniac
AMERICA FTW!!!

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#4
Quote by Cal&Chris_Co.
ive always wondered what exactly a "third" or a "fifth" is?
http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html


It's harmony. Hooray harmony!
#5
They are musical intervals.

In the key of C

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8(octave)
C D E F G A B C
Last edited by myvaliantleap at Jun 13, 2006,
#6
I think 5's and 7's etc, are that many notes up on the scale, i dunno, i learded what power chords are that way, start with your root and play five (or whatever number) up from that as a scale and then you'd find it.
Tina D.
#7
a 3rd is 3 notes up in that scale from the first note. so lets say we were playing in the C scale CDEFGABC harmonizing the in 3rds would be EFGABCDE so if you were playing....



---------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
----------------2-4-5----------------------
--------2-3-5------------------------------
---3-5--------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
rythm guitarist

---------------------------------------------
---------------1-3-5-----------------------
-------0-2-4-------------------------------
--2-3---------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------
you
#8
Quote by z4twenny
3rds are a good start, though 6ths and 5ths both sound good


Thanks dude. I actually wanted it to make a harmonized part to Odd Project's "A Perfect Smile And Broken Wings", and it sounds great. Thanks so much.
Quote by triple_X_maniac
AMERICA FTW!!!

lol jk we suck


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#10
3rd and 5th are both notes in a scale

if you want an example of a fifth, an E powerchord is
2
2
0

the notes on the e and d strings are both the note E, making them the root and octave. the note in between, the 2nd fret on the A string (a B) is the perfect fifth of the E.

A 3rd is the note which gives a major or minor triad (one of the most common kinds of chrds) the either Majorness or Minorness. The minor third of E would be G, which can be played on the 3rd fret of the E string. if you alternate betwen the 3rd fret of the E string and the open E string, it sounds sad, which makes it minor.

Likewise, the major 3rd of E is G Sharp, which can be played on the 4th fret of the e string. if you do the same alternating between open as i mentioned before, it now sounds happy.

hope that cleared things up a bit
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#11
Quote by tina_the_torch
That was an excellent description danilo! thanks, helped me too!



no problem. glad i could help.