#1
1) The one at my other thread:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=5857639#post5857639

2) What wood is best for what tone

3) What wood is lightest, and which is best for sustain

4) when building a solid body, is it necessary to cut the piece of wood in half then glue it together?

5) Is it possible to do it all by hand with hand tools (no router, electric saw, etc) asumming a buy a nech and bolt it on?

The reason for #5 is i'm a cheapass and a hard worker, so i'd rather not spend money on power tools, and i can't find access to woodshops, unless there are public woodshops... are there? <- RUN ON ALERT
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#3
You may be able to use your school's work shop, if you are at school.
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#4
thanks guys, the prob is i'm in canada, so we don't have as many pawn shops, and my school doesn't have so much as a cafeteria, plus i'm only 14
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#5
hmm another thing: can anyone get a me a wiring diagram for two humbucks and a volume each, with a three way switch? that would be greatly appreciated!
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#7
2, Not such thing as ?best wood for tone? tell us what tone you are looking for and we can tell you what is best to get that tone.

3, The lightest wood that is common for guitars is western red cedar. The wood with the best strength to weight ratio (which means you can have the lightest guitar possible if you don?t mind an abnormally thin body) is Sitka spruce. Neither sitka, nor cedar is common for electric guitar but it can be used. The best woods for sustain are the heavy ones. When people are looking for a guitar with really good sustain they typically look for mahogany because it?s kind of a happy medium. Maple, and rosewood would both give you more sustain that Mahogany but that would make for a really heavy guitar.

4, No, it?s not necessary to the piece of wood in half and then glue it together. There are too reasons you see this with guitars. The 1st is that it?s hard to find instrument quality timber large enough. The 2nd reason is that some figured woods, like flamed maple, look better with a bookmatched set then they do with 1 solid chunck.

5. It is possible to do it all with not router or electric saw. To cut the body into shape you could use a hand saw and make several small(ish) straight cuts and then carve it with chisels. You will still need a drill tho. A manual drill will work just fine but I?m probably the only one here with one of those and an electric drill is much easier The neck doesn?t require any power tools either. You can do the whole thing with some wood, glue, clamps, hand saw, and chisel.
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#8
Buy a cheap router. It will be the best investment you make when building a solid-body. I really can't imagine building one without a router. You don't need all the extra stuff, just the basic model will do (~$50), and sometimes you can find them used for cheap.

There are so many holes and pockets that need to be very precise (like the neck pocket, which affects sustain and tone) that trying to do it with a chisel or other hand tools will be very difficult and you'll be throwing away a lot of mistakes.