#1
Not sure if this is the right place to discuss this but what do they teach you when you go to music college? How good do you have to be to get a scholarship? Is it possible to get a scholarship based on how good you are? I am just curious because I can't learn much from the people I am playing with, I have only been playing 7 months but people want to take me to a music college to apply for a scholarship, what kind of music should I play to impress professors? Should I play classical like the flight of the wounded bumblebee (I don't really like classical) or metal which is more my style and I am better at?
#3
The only college I've heard of that'll accept a metal guitar player is Berklee. And it's damn hard to get into.
Member #6 of the Agile LP over Epiphone LP Club. PM iamtehwalrus768 to join.
When it comes to flipping pancakes, it's better than burgers.
#4
you would probably need to be proficient in both. To be honest, when applying for a college scholarship it requires more sufficient knowledge in the advanced skill areas, such as classical. To be honest classical guitar can teach you some incredible things which can be applied to metal if you want to. I recommend classical style of metal for scholarships, but you will benefit from classical learning in any genre.
#5
most colleges make you learn classical. you say youve only been playing 7 months and you think your ready. I think you should put some of your stuff on UG and let us tell you before you make a fool of yourself.
#6
Quote by gogita21
The only college I've heard of that'll accept a metal guitar player is Berklee. And it's damn hard to get into.


I don't know about that. I wouldn't be surprised if a place like GIT would take someone who could rip and know what their doing.
#7
Quote by gogita21
The only college I've heard of that'll accept a metal guitar player is Berklee. And it's damn hard to get into.



berklee???

naw man its easy to get in

staying in is teh hard part
#8
Quote by danilo19
most colleges make you learn classical. you say youve only been playing 7 months and you think your ready. I think you should put some of your stuff on UG and let us tell you before you make a fool of yourself.



agreed
#9
Usually, when you audition, they don't want to hear popular music. They want to see some mastery of fingerstyle. They want to see you play through mistakes. They'll also test your general musicianship skills, like singing back tones, singing intervals, things like that. They might ask you to sight read something. This is just from my personal experience being around a couple different music schools. Best thing to do is contact the school(s) you're interested in and see if they will supply you a list of what you'll face in an audition.
Hi, I'm Peter
#10
Quote by splice
berklee???

naw man its easy to get in

staying in is teh hard part

Until recently. This year they kind of "toughened" their admissions process according to their news. It used to be that just about everyone got in (which was how they got their money) but their new president is changing that so that more people get in who will stay the full course.
Member #6 of the Agile LP over Epiphone LP Club. PM iamtehwalrus768 to join.
When it comes to flipping pancakes, it's better than burgers.
#11
ummm...jazz or classical, if you're going to a music college, forget about learning anything but those two, unless of course, you go to berklee
Quote by krymson
I hope that we could get some real metal out there. I guess A7X a start...
But nu metal does have its moments like Slipknot Mushroomhead and Korn.

Quote by VR2005
...Scales are basically the most useless thing in jazz...

#12
In the US accreditation system...

Most general universities require 36 lower division GE units, and 9 upper division GE units (that is, 36 that are 100/200 level courses, and 9 that are 300/400 level general ed).

The music program is broken in half. For the lower division, regardless of your speciality, you're required to have 4 semesters of theory, 4 semesters of piano, 4 semesters of an ensemble (generally choir, some schools have a guitar program), 2 semesters of music appreciation, and 4 semesters of applied study on the instrument of your choice; for guitar, generally your applied study is classical, and 4 semesters of musicianship that is coupled with the theory sequence.

The upper division just works differently. You choose your specialty, and you're required to audition/interview for it. All proficiencies require a certain level of keyboard ability; generally the ability to play any of the Bach inventions, or the 3 (or 4, if you're crazy) part fugues. There's a proficency requirment for musicianship, generally based off of sight-singing (generally they give you a melody you've never seen before, give you a pitch that's completely disassociated with the starting pitch, and then tell you to sing it; often while clapping/tapping a completely different rhythm, sometimes on each hand, at the same time).

Performance majors for the BFAM are required to have two recitals per year, for all four years, that are progressive in duration and difficulty; that's coupled with independant, one on one, instruction as part of the applied study on your instrument. You're generally required 3 hours of structured practice, logged, per day (realize, this is on /top/ of a full workload otherwise), some upper division thory is required (counterpoint, for instance), and there are some other requirements depending on the specific school (some I don't remember, since I didn't major in performance).

For the applied program, an audition is required. The level of proficiency at your audition generally doesn't have to be very high at the freshmen level; you develop a /lot/ in the first two years you're there. Each semester has a required performance, and a staff jury that's seperate (to judge how much you've developed). Most people get worked up over the performances, but generally it's your instructors recommendation, and how much time you've logged practicing, that determines your grade here. You can almost completely blow the performance and the jury, and still walk out with an A, as long as you show up to both. Which is nice, because a C or lower and you have to re-audition (or if they think you suck too much). This is a space limited program, meaning you may get declined, and should audition before you enter. You're required to work from sheet, and it's a huge time sink -- seriously, an hour lesson every week, 15 hours of lab time per week, and preperation for a performance you're not ready for. Appreciate that -- that's in addition, again, to a full time college workload.

Depending on the school you'll be required to have one or two foriegn language proficiences. Preferrably German, and Italian, in that order. Some schools also require recording/digital technology courses, and generally some other piddly requirements that are completely worthless, but hard to complete.

For most programs, the BFAM degree, regardless of the proficiency, ends up taking about 6 years; and that's if you only want to end up as a neurotic mess at the end. It can be done in four... I've seen seniors kill themselves (literally), trying it. And as an added bonus, a BFAM is almost worthless if you intend to work in music; generally you need your masters or better (on the bright side, that /can/ be done in two years, unless it's in composition).

Most conservatories follow a similar study track, but because they're not public institutions, they can take a little bit of leeway with their course material.

Scholarships are generally not based off of your performing ability. There are a couple, but they're rare, and they tend to go to voice or piano majors. Most scholarships are based off of an application letter, that you write, and one, two, or more, letters of recommendation from associated staff (generally, the department chair works best).

It's generally accepted in acadamia that a BFAM is the hardest degree you can get... The theory sequence has a 90% atrophe rate (generally speaking, you start with 120, and finish with 5 or less). A lot of people can't hack the applied system, counterpoint drops a lot of people, and a lot can't make the piano & musicianship proficiencies work. A lot of music majors end up with BA's, with an emphasis on music, instead of an actual music degree.
Quote by les_kris
Corwinoid is God
I'm not even God-like... I've officially usurped the Almighty's throne.
Click here to worship me.

Member #3 of the Corwinoid Fan Club
Last edited by Corwinoid at Jun 14, 2006,
#13
Quote by modestmouse9191
ummm...jazz or classical, if you're going to a music college, forget about learning anything but those two, unless of course, you go to berklee

Yea man Vai went to Berklee, and he's anything but jazz or classical. lol.
WHOALASKA!! WHOALASKAAAA!!!
#14
I love classical, I just prefer metal. Why don't they like metal? Personally I think metal can be a challenge and sounds great. I have only been playing 7 months but I can play anything (I practice atleast 6 hours a day) I wish I could post my songs I need a MIDI cable and pre-amp. Maybe ill try recording something with my friends cam. Only classic I know is the flight of the wounded bumblebee, Canon in D, and Arcepegios from hell (more neo-classical). Metal is definately more my thing though I can play so much metal its hard to name them all. I mostly do solos and lead. What are some good classical songs to learn? There's one I LOVE on this video but I don't know the name of it... Heres the link http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8227019062398605553&q=Steve+Vai

Thanks in advance, POTFORTY2
#15
Quote by gogita21
The only college I've heard of that'll accept a metal guitar player is Berklee. And it's damn hard to get into.

a guitarist frm Pakistan Named faraz anwer composed a track called charizkuro .. at the age of 16 .. he thn send it to berklee .. who immediately gave him scholarship .. is he too gud .. or is it too easy to get in ..
this is the news:
'Faraz Anwar sent Chairoscuro to Berklee and he at once was given the scholarship. But due to financial problems Faraz Anwar couldn?t go to Berklee and mailed the college that he is facing some problems and that?s why he can?t come. Berklee?s administration upon this gave Faraz Anwar the ?Outstanding Musical Achievement Award 1996?.'
the link to his track
http://www.mizraabianz.com/v1/media/mp3/singles/Faraz_Anwar-Chairoscuro.mp3
to his site
www.farazanwar.com
#16
i dont know much bout classical .. but in love with metal .. so i want to study it in detail ...
is it possible for me smhow to get it .. like if i mail thm ma track of smthin?
#17
^^^ If you really love metal, then learn classical guitar. Modern metal is the product of infusing classical music and theory with distorted guitar and rock sensibilities.
Hi, I'm Peter