#1
Well, I had this discussion with my teacher lately. It was about the fact that I rarely move out of one position when playing lead, while he (and most other guitarist, as he pointed out) switch positions a lot. I said to him: 'Why should you switch positions if you have the same notes in one position? I even like the sound of them better, because they are on thicker strings.' He said something in the likes: 'Well, all those notes start to sound the same if you stay in one position'. I don't really know.. He didn't really had anything to convince me but I noticed he didn't really enjoy my 'backtalking'.

So, what do you think of this? Also, do you move around on the fretboard a lot? Any advice on how to try it out and see if I like it more (except practicing of course)?

Thanks a lot
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#2
Quote by elvenkindje
Well, I had this discussion with my teacher lately. It was about the fact that I rarely move out of one position when playing lead, while he (and most other guitarist, as he pointed out) switch positions a lot. I said to him: 'Why should you switch positions if you have the same notes in one position? I even like the sound of them better, because they are on thicker strings.' He said something in the likes: 'Well, all those notes start to sound the same if you stay in one position'. I don't really know.. He didn't really had anything to convince me but I noticed he didn't really enjoy my 'backtalking'.

So, what do you think of this? Also, do you move around on the fretboard a lot? Any advice on how to try it out and see if I like it more (except practicing of course)?

Thanks a lot


i try to.. i jump to the country key sometimes and i try and mix in some of the notes outside outside of the normal pentatonic positioning

i don't know any runs tho to move around the fretboard
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#3
Yea i move all over the place....the reason this is better is that it allows you to play different licks and go in alot of different octaves, plus you can pull off some really sweet soudning licks when you know how to go all over.
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#4
Your teacher has a point, but it's only to yourself the notes begin to sound the same.
#5
The most obvious thing is that you are limited in what notes you can hammer on/pull off/slide to if you only stay in one position.
#6
Quote by NovemberRain273
it allows you to play different licks

Hmm, but most licks are playable all over the neck and then I mean, what would be the point of switching positions if it's possible at the place I'm currently at?

and go in alot of different octaves

You've got a point here, but I have a sevenstring guitar and when I'm starting on position 10 or 12 or something in the likes of that, I can get almost every note out of the guitar (excluding far stretches)

Quote by bmw8719
The most obvious thing is that you are limited in what notes you can hammer on/pull off/slide to if you only stay in one position.

Hey, that's something I haven't thought of! I use a lot of little slides, thrills and grace notes, so this is something I have to try Thanks a lot! Also, thanks, everybody else
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Last edited by elvenkindje at Jun 14, 2006,
#7
I try to move around a lot. I like to do little pedal tones in higher octaves and then go lower(or higher) and play a lick. Its thing I got from playing trumpet in Jazz band.
#8
Quote by elvenkindje
Hmm, but most licks are playable all over the neck and then I mean, what would be the point of switching positions if it's possible at the place I'm currently at?
The point would be to play a lick that is impossible to play in one position. It also looks cool, thus impressing girls, and we all know why we all started playing, save UG's females.


Quote by elvenkindje
You've got a point here, but I have a sevenstring guitar and when I'm starting on position 10 or 12 or something in the likes of that, I can get almost every note out of the guitar (excluding far stretches)
Except notes on the third fret of your low B string or notes and notes on the 22nd fret of high e.


Learn how to play all over the neck. You'll be a much better player.
#9
Picture yourself playing in the grandest, most exsquisite expression of your soul.
Do you see yourself with your fingers flying all over the neck in that expression,
or with your fingers shackled to one spot of the neck?

Your soul does not like to be boxed in. Learn to use the whole neck.
#10
this is something i tried months ago that has helped my soloing (and songwriting) a lot.

here's your major scale:

------------------------------
------------------------------
------------------------------
-------2-----4--5-----------
-------2--3-----5-----------
----------3-----5-----------


now try moving it over a little bit:


------------------------------
------------------------------
------------------------------
----------4--5-----7------
-------3-----5-----7------
-------3-----5-----7------


you might think "big whoop.. thats like barely a change at all".


i 110% guarantee you if you switch to that position during a solo, youre going to be making up different licks and you're playing is gonna sound a lot different than usual.
you're now hammerin on from the 2nd to 3rd, which you've never done before, you're consistently playing the 9th, giving your song a different feel.

theres a plethora of difference in a 2 fret movement. THATS my reason for not staying in one position.


and also try not to think when soloing of "boxes" and "patterns", rather think about the theory behind things, the notes, think "ok in about 2 seconds, i wanna hit a high note... hmmm lets make it a 7th, so i can slide up to the octave right after!"
#11
I use almost the whole neck, except I don't use the highest 4 frets too often... I don't know why, I prefer the mid-range I guess.

I've been trying to incorporate some open-string ideas into my playing, and position shifts can definitely help you get the most out of that. Sounding the open string(s) can help give your lines a sense of continuity while you switch positions.
#12
The Timbre of the sound changes, so although it is the same note you're playing, it can sound different elsewhere on the neck because the strings are thicker/thinner. I see his point, and i see yours. but regardless of all that, learning to play around the neck is part of being a guitar player. Plus all this should be coverd when you learn your modes.. you are learning your modes aren't you?
#13
reasons to move around the neck:

1. It makes for more interesting phrasing, and allows subtle variations which seperate average playing from good playing.

2. If you're playing in a band situation, with bass and drums and vocals, it is important to know how to play in different octaves. The dynamics of the rest of the band can drown you out if everyone is on the same frequency as you.

3. Whether you believe it or not, it WILL open up new ideas and methods of thinking about your playing. There are 6 different location of the note E within the first 12 frets. Why only play E in one position when there are so many different ways to play that key?

4. Knowing your way around the neck makes writing music easier. By learning the whole fretboard, you begin to simply "know" where certain sounds are, and how they work together.

5. It makes key changes and chord modification a lot easier if you know keys in different positions too.

6. Being able to write riffs using two or more different positions for the same key can make for some very interesting stuff as well.
#14
i agree you should learn scales al over the fretboard, once you know majors and minors going further up the neck, working with modes and "runs" up the fretboard become alot easier
#16
There are 148 notes on my guitar neck. I utilize every one of those 148 I can.
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#17
there are certain places i'll solo on the neck, i try to find a key, find all the areas i can solo in that one key, then move to another key. i mostley use E, A, and C, their simple and they seem to work for me. i try to make the most of all the notes as much as a can
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#18
a D sounds different when played on 7th fret than when it's played on the 3rd,
it's the minor differences in sound that you hear. and of course running from 24th to the 1st fret is impressive to an audience that doesn't play(or suck at it n some cases)
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#19
If Im soloing in an open key (eg, whatever my guitar is tuned to, with open strings) a cool lick to do, is a doublestop using open strings. Simply strike the G and the B, then reach your index finger around and press behind the nut. It looks and sounds really cool (cooler than other doublestops)
#20
Quote by Applehead
The Timbre of the sound changes, so although it is the same note you're playing, it can sound different elsewhere on the neck because the strings are thicker/thinner. I see his point, and i see yours. but regardless of all that, learning to play around the neck is part of being a guitar player. Plus all this should be coverd when you learn your modes.. you are learning your modes aren't you?

this is huge for me. you have a much different sound on a thick string than a thin string. like, if you're soloing and you want to do a big fat-sounding bend on an A. 14th fret on the G string sounds thick and full, but 5th fret on the hi E sounds pathetically weak. and somebody did say, which is correct, that your legato (hammerons pulloffs slides) options are enhanced by using different fingerings. also, if you want to fill out your sound with chords and double stops in your soloing, you need access to lots of different fingering options. this also applies if you want to allow other notes to continue to ring out while playing others.
#21
the best reason i have found is this... like if you are in the a scale, you cant like do a fast pulloff from e to d to c in the first scale... if you use the second scale you can. stuff like that.
you cant slide to certain notes, and it is nicer to like play a few of the same notes in one scale and then move up to an octave higher scale and play the same notes on lower strings, etc... you can slide from scale to scale, giving a more flowing sound, and its just overall cooler, cuz it looks like you are doing a lot of complicated stuff moving all over the neck. so, even though all the same notes can pretty much be played on all the scales, they are there for a reason. and eventually you probably will need to move from one to another for some song or something, and moving to different ones probably will make you a better player and bump you up a step you are trying to get to. listen to your guitar teacher.
#22
I tend to stay in the scale box patterns, go up an octave for the climax of the solo :/ Want a different sound use some different scales
#23
good thread. A lot of the subconcious decisions that you make for note choice, have to do with comfort and ease.

you're (going off of personal experience here) rarely going to play a 4th if it's a finger roll.

now when you move up to the G and B strings, that 4th is now a fret apart, I find I use that a whole lot more, and it's a lot more likely to become part of a lick I write.
#24
Quote by Steve Cropper
There are 148 notes on my guitar neck. I utilize every one of those 148 I can.


Eh.. I thought there were 12 notes?!

I try to use the entire neck, especially with pents and blues scales. I can also play pretty fluently with the 3-note-per-string scales all over the neck. It's just a matter of memorizing and feeling comfortable in every position.
#25
first of all playing in one position and in one scale on your axe is noob-ish. Mix it up, do modal melodies, i like to add some classic sweeps and if possible end on a good pentatonic
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#27
Quote by mikeman
Eh.. I thought there were 12 notes?!



He means there's 148 places to play a note on his guitar, and even though some of those notes will be the same note, in the same octave, they will still sound different because of the thickness of the string.
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