#1
my guitar teacher told me i can only get a C in GCSE music if i can only read tab instead of standard notation....is this true?

he also said i wont be able to play at gigs if i cant read standard notation...is this true either?
#2
uh...what's GCSE music...im assuming it's a class your taking and yes, you will probably get a bad grade. I don't respect any guitar player who can't read music, i mean, how can you call youself a musician, if you can't read music? It's like a poet who can't read words. LEARN TO READ. If you ever tried to talk about guitar to a classical or jazz guitarist, and they knew you couldn't read music, they would laugh at you. Very hard.
Quote by krymson
I hope that we could get some real metal out there. I guess A7X a start...
But nu metal does have its moments like Slipknot Mushroomhead and Korn.

Quote by VR2005
...Scales are basically the most useless thing in jazz...

#4
Quote by jak-ben
thanks anyway, but .... face it....ur a prick



Maybe i am, it just struck me as funny and kinda dumb that someone would think they could pass a music class without being able to read real music
Quote by krymson
I hope that we could get some real metal out there. I guess A7X a start...
But nu metal does have its moments like Slipknot Mushroomhead and Korn.

Quote by VR2005
...Scales are basically the most useless thing in jazz...

#5
Quote by modestmouse9191
Maybe i am, it just struck me as funny and kinda dumb that someone would think they could pass a music class without being able to read real music


bro, hes got a point. i mean its like being in college without knowing how to read, write, or add
Quote by Mad Marius
Because there's no point in being on the Internet of you're not gonna act like an arrogant prick.
#6
well, if you want to learn to read, i would suggest Berklee Modern Metheod for guitar vl. 1, that book gives you all the main scale forms, and has a ton of excersizes, once you're comfortable with that, get vl. 2, i don't have vl. 3, but i would think it's just overkill
Quote by krymson
I hope that we could get some real metal out there. I guess A7X a start...
But nu metal does have its moments like Slipknot Mushroomhead and Korn.

Quote by VR2005
...Scales are basically the most useless thing in jazz...

#8
Quote by jak-ben
thanks anyway, but .... face it....ur a prick


with that kinduv attitude towards

A) guitar skills

B) true musicianship

3) other people.

i'd hate to have to know you personally.
#9
Quote by jak-ben
my guitar teacher...also said i won't be able to play at gigs if i can't read standard notation...is this true either?
This isn't technically true, as you can always devote years to memorizing every piece of music you might be called on to play as a professional musician. In my opinion, though, you'll do yourself a huge service by making whatever effort necessary to learn to read standard notation. I can't tell you how many times I've been approached by a customer at a gig and asked to play a song I've never heard of in honor of somebody's engagement, anniversary, birthday, or some other special occasion. It's usually "their song" - I'm sure you get the picture. If you can pull out a fake book and play the tune you're their hero. If you can't, you're a zero.

I won't go so far as to say I don't respect a musician who can't read standard notation. After all, Paul McCartney is a lifelong hero of mine and he claims he can't read a note. But on the other hand, few of us have his talent and none of us has his resume'. You're really much, much better off if you learn to read.

Good luck with your GCSE dilemma. -gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#10
Quote by gpb0216
This isn't technically true, as you can always devote years to memorizing every piece of music you might be called on to play as a professional musician.


And even then, if you're at a gig playin one of those songs, and the singer, midway thru song, says "repeat from bar 24, we're gonna have a bass solo!" , then you need to know

1) where you are right now

2) where bar 24 is

and all that, so if you cant read you'd be lost if he told you that.
#11
Quote by mangablade
"repeat from bar 24, we're gonna have a bass solo!"


Manga you kill me!

Poster,


What do you want from your studies? Your music? Do you want to be a professional musician? Do you want to be in a rock band? a session musician?

because this matters when it comes to reading music. reading music is a valuable skill, one which can get you paid work easily. it is not however necessary if you do not want to be a session player, or play in jazz bands... you know already some of the greats cannot sight-read, this proves the point quite dramatically. But i bet if you put paul McCartney in front of a piece of music with a band, he would be seriously humbled, because the others would be playing away and he would be lost, quite literally. I can read sheet music, i am not fluent, but i will be at some point. I can read it for piano and bass and a little for guitar. it's hard, and takes time but i promise you it is a skill that you will keep for life and you'll be so happy that you took the time out from masturbating and playing guitar to learn it. Trust me.

Good luck with your exam. I remember my GCSE's, heh heh.
#12
Quote by modestmouse9191
I don't respect any guitar player who can't read music, i mean, how can you call youself a musician, if you can't read music?

Two words, 'Paul' and 'McCartney', and im aware he was a bass player
"If you want beef, then bring the ruckus." - Marilyn Monroe
#13
There are some great musicians who can't read music. That doesn't mean that I recommend ignorance, however.

Why not take the oppurtunity to do something that could improve your understanding of music? I don't understand how some people can be so opposed to learning. I think the idea of learning something that can help you as a player and a musician to be rewarding. Learning to read music will not take years of your life hunched over books in a classroom: you can probably get the basics down in a few classes with a good teacher. Give it a shot.
#14
Quote by gpb0216
This isn't technically true, as you can always devote years to memorizing every piece of music you might be called on to play as a professional musician. In my opinion, though, you'll do yourself a huge service by making whatever effort necessary to learn to read standard notation. I can't tell you how many times I've been approached by a customer at a gig and asked to play a song I've never heard of in honor of somebody's engagement, anniversary, birthday, or some other special occasion. It's usually "their song" - I'm sure you get the picture. If you can pull out a fake book and play the tune you're their hero. If you can't, you're a zero.

I won't go so far as to say I don't respect a musician who can't read standard notation. After all, Paul McCartney is a lifelong hero of mine and he claims he can't read a note. But on the other hand, few of us have his talent and none of us has his resume'. You're really much, much better off if you learn to read.

Good luck with your GCSE dilemma. -gpb





It can be intimidating at first, but i have found It gives you more confidence as a musician, is infinitely useful and is a massivly important tool, and is just an all round good thing to know.

Also without it learning theory would be nearly impossible.
(Im still a grade 2 man )
Tears in waves, minds on fire
Nights alone by your side