#1
I noticed recently that on my low e string, the third fret is just slightly flat, but open is right on. the 12th fret is right on too, so its not the intonation. is this fixable. it is a very high quality guitar. i dunno, maybe its all in my head. you cant bend a string flat though, so if i thought i heard it flat, wouldn't it be?

i dunno, maybe im paranoid. but is it fixable if it is slightly flat. thanks.
#3
thanks.

and also, the 21st fret has a very small nitch somewhere between the high b and e strings, making bends unsmooth if not impossible. i assume the shop can just smooth this flaw out?
#4
Usually, yeah, they can just "work those out" (pardon the expression ).

Doesn't seem like such a high-quality guitar if there are multiple problems with construction...
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#5
um...I always thought the first few frets were sharp on guitars...

you can bend the string flat. just pull it towards the bridge
#6
maybe your frets are worn out...
try taking out your strings, and work it out with glass paper..

but yea, take to the near store to have it setuped.
#7
Quote by scheck006
um...I always thought the first few frets were sharp on guitars...

you can bend the string flat. just pull it towards the bridge


Well, usually whenever they ring out sharp I think they're probably just getting played too hard or being bent. There is still a bit of room to press the strings down under the fret crown even on un-scalloped frets.

And bending the string flat is a bit too hard to do and make it practical within the context of a fast run.
#9
Quote by Slurgi
Well, usually whenever they ring out sharp I think they're probably just getting played too hard or being bent. There is still a bit of room to press the strings down under the fret crown even on un-scalloped frets.

And bending the string flat is a bit too hard to do and make it practical within the context of a fast run.


I mean...


I thought that the way the guitar is designed makes the first few frets always sharp. That's why we have compensated nut modifications like the buzz feiten to make the intonation proper.
#10
Quote by scheck006
I mean...


I thought that the way the guitar is designed makes the first few frets always sharp. That's why we have compensated nut modifications like the buzz feiten to make the intonation proper.


If that was the case, though, why wouldnt luthiers just adjust the frets slightly towards the nut if it wasn't user error?

#13
Err, guitars tend to get sharp up the neck, not down it. It's a relief vs. temper issue that's impossible to resolve. The first few frets tend to be flat, which is why the first fret is oversized by about 5% on most guitars. I've never run into a guitar that didn't have some slight tuning issues on the extreme frets, it's normal, especially since most people don't understand what 'in tune' really is.

I mean seriously, "designed to make the first few frets sharp"? Can you, please, explain exactly what 'sharp' means in this context?

The fanned fret system has it's own problems, but doesn't get rid of this one either.

Ed: BTW, the frets really easy to fix, but the intonation issue might not be (and it might very well be in your head, again, no offense, not really understanding what's in tune and what's not, if you're reading it off of a tuner).
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Last edited by Corwinoid at Jun 17, 2006,
#14
I didnt mean it was designed to make them sharp...I just thought that they were out of tune, because of the way the neck was made and that it was a problem you couldn't get around.

Either way, the first few frets are out of tune usually, and seeing as how different chords require different tunings of the same note, it's virtually impossible to play a guitar perfectly in tune.