#1
Right, you're all probably going to think i'm a n00b for asking this, but we all ahve to start somewhere. I was just wondering what a grace note is and how to play it? Please help!
#2
if im not mistaken a grace not is a ghost note. you dont HAVE to play it.

#3
its a really short note occuring JUST before the normal note.

if you were playing a bar of quarter notes, it would look like this:

----Q-----Q--(g)Q-----Q----

listen to dani california. the first verse riff has it, it goes:

--------------------------------------
------7-------------5-3------------------
--------------------------------------
-5-5------(2)3-3-----------------------------


listen for the rythmn
#5
well in that case, its just a hammer on done quickly.

its also called an "Acciatura". it can also be a "appoggiatura", but it goes: appogiatura's = grace notes, but grace notes = appogiatura's , understand?

grace note
n.

A musical note, especially an appoggiatura, that is added as an embellishment, and is printed in small type and not counted in rhythm.

honestly just give the song a listen real quick for the rythmn part.
#6
I might sound like an idiot asking this, but you know you said that its like a quick hammer on, do you hammer on the grace note, or the note that comes after it?
#7
you fret the grace note, and quickly hammer on to the next one.


this of course, dosnt work if your grace note is on one string, and the next note is on another. for this, think "Money - Pink Floyd". the part of the line where you "rake" your finger down to get that Octave - 5th - root arpeggio, you could do the same motion if a grace note was on the D or G and the next was on the A or D (just for example).

if you want the "more or less" rythmn of the grace note to next note, imagine therse only the normal note. cut it into 6 pieces (lets say triplet sixteenths if its a quarter note). now take 1 of those pieces (the first one) and make it a seperate note.

as for accenting: usually if its a grace to next note thats like 1/2/3 semi tones away, the "next" note is the accented one, especially i find, in modern music.

though lets say you're doing a classical piece. maybe theres one high grace note, descending 8 semitones to the next note. then in that case, if they want the audience to hear the "big drop", they could accent either the high grace, or both notes.
#8
thanks i think i was doing it right all along but i didnt want to look like a prick incase i was doing it wrong