#1
Right I'm really confused (which doesn't take much!) but how do they work?

I know that they make your sound bigger but do they just plug into the back of your amp (like my mate thinks) or do you use mics postioned near your amp (what I think)?

Help!
My gear:

Gibson Gothic Flying V
Engl Screamer Combo
Maxon OD-9
Squier 10w amp
#2
you've got 3 parts basically

mixer - into here you can plug microphones or run things direct (bass, keyboards, acoustic guitars and guitar amps with a line out possibly). In my experience mic'ing a guitar amp usually sounds better.

power amp - makes the output of the mixer strong enought to run the speakers

speakers - speakers


In some of the low end ones you've got the mixer and poweramp combined in the same box as a powered mixer
#3
So you can mic or plug your amp straight in?
My gear:

Gibson Gothic Flying V
Engl Screamer Combo
Maxon OD-9
Squier 10w amp
#4
Quote by Tubey
So you can mic or plug your amp straight in?

yep both will work.

But you have to remember that guitar speakers and cabinets add a lot to the sound of an electric guitar. Though in most decent amps theres a speaker simulator in it that supposed to make it sound better when running it direct (basically it cuts off the higher frequencies the same way a speaker does)
#5
concerning only the guitar, you have 2 possibilities:
1. you go from the line-out of your amp right into the mixing console of the F.O.H. or you take a microphone which is positioned in front of your guitar-speakers, this microphone goes right away into the mixing console.
So I'd say that 99% of the guitar players use a microphone instead of the line-out version, because that - and only that - gives you the right tone and authentic sound of a guitar, espacially rock guitar.
When it comes to clean sounds, the differences between those two methods might not be that big, but for all other sounds - just take a mic.
#6
hmm kinda getting it now. Anyone else got anything to add?
My gear:

Gibson Gothic Flying V
Engl Screamer Combo
Maxon OD-9
Squier 10w amp
#7
you have another, a third possibility: the fact, that a line signal is much cleaner and much easier to mix for the FOH-Mixer, you can use a so-called speaker-simulator, which wants to combine the sound-advantages of a mic with the signal-advantages of a line-signal.
But it's hard to find one that really sounds great imo.
#8
Thanks for the info so far guys. It's just my drummer has the keys to a studio and they have a nice PA system so it'll be nice to basically know what I'm doing.
My gear:

Gibson Gothic Flying V
Engl Screamer Combo
Maxon OD-9
Squier 10w amp