Poll: Which slide?
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View poll results: Which slide?
Glass
18 75%
Steel
4 17%
Brass
2 8%
Voters: 24.
#1
I'm interested in experimenting with slide guitar.

I'm completely new to it and was wondering if anyone could explain the - I assume, minor - differences between the 3 types of slides (well, the 3 for sale on GAK )

Glass, Steel or Brass
- Gibson Les Paul Studio
- Squier Standard Strat
- Roland Cube 60
- Visual Sound Jekyll & Hyde
- Boss OD-3
- Behringer EQ700
Last edited by SamDking at Jun 18, 2006,
#2
Well, I don't have a clue/care about brass, but I've got a glass slide, and a chrome slide (steel)

The chrome slide works well on my Strat, bbut the glass one doesn't.
And the glass one works better on my acoustic.
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Fender Strat/Tokai LS80>few pedals>Orange Rocker 30
#3
glass = warmer tone
metal = brighter tone (can easily get too bright)

whatever you get make sure its big enough to fit on your finger and thats its rather massive and heavey for a stronger sound
#4
I'm going to vote glass, but I only bought my first slide yesterday. Although that was after a bit of testing in the shop.
#5
I have a glass slide, and a Strat, and it sounds aweful. Okay, so that's probably just me not knowing how to play slide guitar, but still, i know more than enough to know that the tone is pathetic. i would go with a steel slide.


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#6
I have the same question. For electric stuff, I guess a metal slide would do right? But then again Duane used a glass slide on his LP right?. I'm confused
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#7
I have a glass and a brass slide. The glass one sounds like crap on my LP, while the brass one is great. More sustain, grittier tone, and brighter but not too bright at all. Steel would be brighter than brass.
#8
woohoo, i go against all again. I use a medicine bottle slide. (a real medicine bottle my friends dad is a doctor or something) and i find its great. But then again i always have had a really unique taste in sound. Go into a shop and see if you can try them out.
#9
I have this ceramic side that sound great for my electrics. Very nice tone and comfortable on my finger. Check one out.
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#10
generally, slide playing doesn't sound great on electric guitars as they tend to have lower actions and thinner strings than acoustics, hence it's not very loud and there's a lot of grinding on frets. for clumsy people like me metal slides are the way to go because at least you're not going to break them if you stand on it
"Anytime but now
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I've got to think about my own life
The world is not our facility
We have a responsibility
To use our abilities to keep this place alive," said ian mackaye
#11
The basic rule is: Glass for acoustics, Steel or Brass for electrics. However, some people break the 'rule's, Clapton uses a glass slide on electric on the rare occasions that he does slide, for instance.

And whoever said slide doesn't work well on electrics should just listen to Layla!
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#12
I've got a brass one and it sounds really bright and crap with my light strings
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#13
slide will work alright on electrics if you set the action up a bit higher, but most people don't fancy playing with a high action. it can certainly be done, and by all means experiment, but (imo) it works better on acoustic
"Anytime but now
Anywhere but here
Anyone but me
I've got to think about my own life
The world is not our facility
We have a responsibility
To use our abilities to keep this place alive," said ian mackaye
#14
I have a glass and have played some with a steel one too. and I feel that the glass one is very slippery and hard to get a good grip on, and it's also very light. the steel one's much nicer for me to hold.

a ceramic one would be interesting to try out I think.

but the feel of the slide is important, just as much as tone I would say. you can allways get more slides also.
#15
Thanks for everyone's opinions, keep 'em coming.

It seems pretty tied between the three as far as I can see. I might just have to get a couple. I'll pop into my local shop and see if I can try some, see which ones i like best. Although I have no real idea how to play the thing
- Gibson Les Paul Studio
- Squier Standard Strat
- Roland Cube 60
- Visual Sound Jekyll & Hyde
- Boss OD-3
- Behringer EQ700
#16
PickNGrin had a video on slide playing. I suggest you watch some of it before you try any slides. I bought my slide, then later found out that I had been using it wrong.
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#17
Quote by Strat_Monkey
The basic rule is: Glass for acoustics, Steel or Brass for electrics. However, some people break the 'rule's, Clapton uses a glass slide on electric on the rare occasions that he does slide, for instance.

And whoever said slide doesn't work well on electrics should just listen to Layla!

Amen
Huzzah! It is I, S0ulja, the Duke Of Swiss, 3rd member of the Royal order of cheese!

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#18
I have a glass that I use on an acoustic tuned to open E. I haven' played much slide on electirc yet due to the action issues. I will probably try a smaller brass slide on the pinky for electric. For acoustic I have been useing my middle finger for the slide, due to the fact that most of the songs are all slide, no fingered chords. But for electric I want to switch to my pinky to leave the rest of my hand free.
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#19
The important thing to remember with slide playing is, and I'm going to make this nice and clear, DO NOT TRY AND PRESS THE STRINGS DOWN WITH THE SLIDE. What you need to do is keep the slide directly above the fret wire (the metal bit, if you don't already know) of the fret you're playing. You'll need to practise a lot, as it's more different from normal playing than most people expect, plus you'll probably need to start using open tunings like EBEGBE, DADGAD or CGCGCE. Or about a hundred others.

Anyway, now I've put you off slide playing for life, good luck!
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#20
Quote by S0ulja23

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strat_Monkey
The basic rule is: Glass for acoustics, Steel or Brass for electrics. However, some people break the 'rule's, Clapton uses a glass slide on electric on the rare occasions that he does slide, for instance.

And whoever said slide doesn't work well on electrics should just listen to Layla!

Amen


Amen indeed...
#21
Dude this thread is like a year old
- Gibson Les Paul Studio
- Squier Standard Strat
- Roland Cube 60
- Visual Sound Jekyll & Hyde
- Boss OD-3
- Behringer EQ700
#22
So which slide did you get?
Ibanez AFS75/Fender Strat Plus > Fulltone Deja' Vibe > Keeley TS808 MOD+ > Fulltone OCD > VanAmps SoleMate > Metro JTM45
#23
Haha, got a steel one in the end.

Don't use it an awful lot, but when I do I like the experimental sounds I can make from it.
- Gibson Les Paul Studio
- Squier Standard Strat
- Roland Cube 60
- Visual Sound Jekyll & Hyde
- Boss OD-3
- Behringer EQ700