#1
We'll, I've been playing guitar for about a year (had it for about 2) and I want to be real good at it

I'm taking Music Theory in school next year but I didn't wanna walk into class without having any idea of anything. I went to Guitar Center and bought this amazing book titled "The Guitar Grimoire" by Adam Kadmon and I wanted to get right to work on learning all these scales, but I ran into a small problem.

See I don't know how to read the scales it shows me in the book. F Major is the very first one it shows, and if someone could explain to me what I'm supposed to do (look at the picture at the bottom to see how it is in the book), I'd really appreciate it. I sure hope to get started soon and if you guys can show me how to play one, the others will be simple to figure out.

And any other helping tips would be great too. Thanks in advance


#2
that's the neck of the guitar the first note of the scale is the first dot on the leftmost line. you read one line at a time (which represent strings on the guitar). so you read each string top to bottom, the big dots being the frets you play. then when you're done reading top to bottom, go to the next line (string) and play the frets top to bottom. and i'm guessing the one means first position.
#3
the dots indicated the notes of the scale. you play the notes from the E string first ( F-G-A) then go to the next string...
#4
ok do you see the top line on the neck BOLDED that is the top of the neck and you just play the frets it shows
#5
Alright that clears that up. Thanks Now, what do you recomend I do when playing these scales? Should I just go through all of them until my fingers are faster? Or is there another point to it?
#6
^That's a pretty simple scale diagram - I'm sure you know how to read tab, and that diagram is just tab in picture form.

The string on the left is your low E string - your first note (F - the note which defines the scale) is the first fret. The second note is a G - 3rd fret and so forth.

Just look at it as your fretboard - hold your guitar infront of you, neck pointing away from you and compare that to the photo.

That's a simple major scale pattern you should get used to - and you'll find is moveable, so you can apply it to every key.

Comprends?

Quote by AnarchyGuitarst
Alright that clears that up. Thanks Now, what do you recomend I do when playing these scales? Should I just go through all of them until my fingers are faster? Or is there another point to it?


Most people will run through scale patterns like that daily as a warm up routine and to improve finger independance and dexterity, which - by all means, helps.

You should be concentrating on using those patterns to improvise with.
Last edited by Johnljones7443 at Jun 18, 2006,
#7
Thanks alot, Johnljones7443. I'm gonna start working on speed technique with these major scales and all their modes
#8
its like this.... ok dot a-s are there, dot a being the first note to hit, b the second, c the third...etc.
p m I I I I
I I j g I I
q n k h d a
I I I I I I
r o L i e b
I I I I f c


it's kind of hard to read, so here's a vocal explanation if you can't
play the first dot on the low e string, then the next dot on that string, and so on and then do the same for the string under it and the string under that one

hope i helped
#10
just turn the diagram sidways counter clockwise 90 degrees and wala, you are looking down at your neck of your guitar while its on your lap. then play all the dots on one string before you move up to the next one.
#11
Quote by Tim69
its not the easiest scale to start on but ho hum!


I was going to comment on that - but he's been playing for a year. The stretch shouldn't be that much of a problem.

But if you do have problems, you can always move the pattern to G, or A or something - which will help you understand the patterns and how they're applied throughout the fretboard.