#1
When walking bass lines are written, are they written from scales? and what are some tips for writing them?
#2
All a walking line is using scales to get to the root of each chord in the progression.
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#3
Well, it's a bit more than that! it's using specific notes or "approach notes" to get to the root of each chord. usually they are half or whole steps. but yes, you will need to know your scales and really modes to create good, improvised walking basslines.
Last edited by Applehead at Jun 19, 2006,
#4
they tend to stick to arpegios or specifically designated chords, like 9's and 11's ive noticed too. learn your theory, especially chord progression, scales, and keys, and walking basslines wont seem so daunting.
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#7
Chord progression means how the chords are put together. The route they take from beginning to end. there are many commonly used progressions. take for example 12 bar blues, it goes root, 4th, fith - tonic, sub-dominant, dominant. so the progression is I-IV-V. this comes from the scale notes. so in the key of C it would be C, F, G if you have a piano it's easier to see it, but if you play it on your bass try playing any note on the E string, say the G, then move your finger down to the C on the A string (basses tuned a 4th apart remember) , then move it across to the D for the perfect 5th.

if this stll doesnt make sense, you're going to need to learn a but of theory methinks..
#9
Quote by bass_newb37
haha sigged!


Please do not laugh and sig people for asking a quesiton if they dont understand something. The only stupid question is the one you dont ask.

Now please delete your post, it's spam
#10
Quote by Applehead
Chord progression means how the chords are put together. The route they take from beginning to end. there are many commonly used progressions. take for example 12 bar blues, it goes root, 4th, fith - tonic, sub-dominant, dominant. so the progression is I-IV-V. this comes from the scale notes. so in the key of C it would be C, F, G if you have a piano it's easier to see it, but if you play it on your bass try playing any note on the E string, say the G, then move your finger down to the C on the A string (basses tuned a 4th apart remember) , then move it across to the D for the perfect 5th.

if this stll doesnt make sense, you're going to need to learn a but of theory methinks..


so would G or I, be the 3 fret, on E string, and following that itd be IV or C (3rd note on A String, then itd use D or V, which would be open D string. So is it saying youd use the 1rst, 4rth, and 5th notes in the scales
#11
Quote by bass_newb37
haha sigged!


Honestly, I would punch you in the mouth for that if I could. Delete that, and stop making derogative posts or I'm going to start reporting. In the bass forum, we don't poke fun at or flame anyone (with the exception of guitarists who say bass isn't hard because it has four strings).
#12
Quote by Jonny182
so would G or I, be the 3 fret, on E string, and following that itd be IV or C (3rd note on A String, then itd use D or V, which would be open D string. So is it saying youd use the 1rst, 4rth, and 5th notes in the scales


Exactly right, yes. However, i would probably not use the open D, although there is no reason not to. it's the note that counts, posistion is up to you. i just find it easier to keep to that same pattern as you can apply it anywhere on the neck you see. You can't use the open in that way. better to get used to the pattern

This is just one chord progression though, if you google "common chord progressions" you will get a bit more info, and probably a long list of common ones used in rock music. Just remember the roman numerals equate to notes in the scale, so as we are in the key of C for our example, it's easy as there are no sharps or flats in C. A key with sharps and flats is a bit harder to work out off the top of your head, but you'll get there. i started by learning all the intervals for each key.. try doing that. So, if i said the 5th of C, you now know it is G. So, what would be the 5th of E?
#13
Quote by Beleuchtung
All a walking line is using scales to get to the root of each chord in the progression.

Actually, any chord tone will work, whether it be a 3rd, 5th, or 19th. You don't have to use just the root.
#14
Quote by bass_newb37
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you were reported, and I feel your insensitivity was wrong, but I don't know if its entirely warnable. But please try to be productive on some level the next time you make any post in any forum at all. Thanks. *thumbs up*
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#15
Quote by Scourge441
Actually, any chord tone will work, whether it be a 3rd, 5th, or 19th. You don't have to use just the root.


Thanx, i was just going off what i was told.
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