#1
Hi, I am just wondering if what I am doing is fairly and generally right, because I have just started this routine in last week and have started practiing regularly like this for the first time in all of my 3 years of playing. So here it is -

about 15-30min of picking/fretting/finger exercises.
about 15-30min of scales and modes.
about 15min of playing and learning new songs.

This is all played strickly to a metronome.
I started on 60bpm and am now on 66 bpm a week later. I have been told (and have observed from the UG lessons) to add about 1-2 bpm each day to gain technique, speed, and skill overtime.

Is this a correct and effective method of a practice routine and metronome usage?
Some simple advice and feedback would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
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#2
Aslong as you're aware of what you're doing and are concentrating on what you're doing - any practice is good practice.

Awareness and concentration is essential. Especially if you only have a small time frame to work with, like you do.
#4
Heck, i just start out with a couple scales, play a couple fast songs, then play w/e i feel like. It's real strict, beleive me.
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#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Sadly, that is not nearly enough practice time to make any significant progress.

I don't believe that. If someone practices correctly, then getting in one hour of practice time would be much more beneficial than several hours of incorrect practice. The key is to go slow enough that you aren't making any mistakes and then slowly increasing your speed. There are a few programs that recommend practicing at a snail's pace for up to 3 weeks, developing precise muscle memory, which will ultimately allow you to play faster.
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#6
Quote by Dirk Gently
I don't believe that. If someone practices correctly, then getting in one hour of practice time would be much more beneficial than several hours of incorrect practice. The key is to go slow enough that you aren't making any mistakes and then slowly increasing your speed. There are a few programs that recommend practicing at a snail's pace for up to 3 weeks, developing precise muscle memory, which will ultimately allow you to play faster.
Obviously good practice is better than bad practice, but 1:15 of good practice is not going to improve your playing as much as 3 or 4 hours of good practice.
#7
^true, but you would have to be a highly focused musician to be able to practice effectively for 3 or 4 whole hours. i personally think you are not spending enough time learning songs themselves. it seems odd to spend as much time exercising as you do putting that exercising into practice.
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#8
Learning new songs is a form of practice
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#9
i was referring to practice as in exercises such as picking practice, scales, etc. my bad
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#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Sadly, that is not nearly enough practice time to make any significant progress.


I also disagree, if 1:15 is all they have to use then that's it. Sure, like you said, it's better to have 3 or 4 hours and 8 hours is better than 4 but some of us have more to do. I personally only get about an hour a day if I'm lucky and I can see significant gains... over time. If you're a pro and doing it for a living then a guy should practice about 6 - 8 hours a day.

Carnivean: Sounds like you are covering lots of stuff as well, you didn't mention theory and that's important too. There are some good articles here but you may already know that. Don't forget to have fun though, I stick to a loose schedule because sometimes I just want to play songs and other times I just want to play scales but I make sure I get everything in sometime.

les makes a good point, you don't want to overdo the exercises and not put the scales to use so don't forget about learning songs and grabbing some backing tracks to jam with, I make lots of progress just messing around with backing tracks and seeing what works and what doesn't.
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#11
You CAN make progress in that time with GOOD practice. 15 minutes of really
focused work is better than a few hours of trying to play some tab as fast as you
can.

Obviously, getting better on the guitar involves a LOT of things. Scales, technqiue,
theory, learning songs, chords, rythym... Sometimes the sheer quantity of it can
seem overhwelming.

The way to approach it is to prioritize and put the really critical stuff first. For me,
that is technique. Because, until my mind and body can do all the things I want
them to do, all the other stuff will be limited by it. So, 90% of my guitar time is
spent on technique practice. That's my approach anyway, because for many years
I spent a lot of time fooling around. So, it's kind of catch up for me.

I'd think for any beginner - intermediate your technique will be your prime limiting
factor and probably should be at least 50% of your practice. You may think its
boring, but when you start to see results you wouldn't practice any other way
and it actually becomes ENJOYABLE.
#14
When I started guitar for probably 2 months I practiced 15 minutes a day. I practiced chords and scales and a few songs, I progessed nicely. It just depends on how focused you are.
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#15
Thanks alot guys for mature answers, I'm not a beginner by any means though, but in my 3 years this has just been recently the first time i have strictly practiced and I just wanna make it right.
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#16
Quote by Carnivean
Thanks alot guys for mature answers, I'm not a beginner by any means though, but in my 3 years this has just been recently the first time i have strictly practiced and I just wanna make it right.


Yes, I'm the same. I've been 'playing' (messing around) for a number of years and am just getting serious into it over the last 6 months so I've run into this question as well. I think FINDING technique ideas to practice is hard but I've downloaded the Kristopher Dauhl (sp??) vids and even though I'm not that fast he talks quite a bit about technique and I've picked up lots from him already. You should also check out pick 'n grin's stuff, he talks about technique as well and you're bound to pick something up to practice there as well.
-Red 1990 Fender Strat with maple neck
-Cream colored Strat. GFS Premium II pickups.
-Line6 spider 210 and Fender Pinceton Chorus amps
-Zoom G2