#1
Hey all. I would like to fix up my Squire Strat a little bit. Now before you give me that "dont bother... it's a squire" routine, just know that I dont care what kind of guitar it is. It was my first guitar I ever had and it holds a lot of sentimental value to me. And besides that, it really doesnt sound half bad. So as long as it's laying around I'd like to make it as playable as possible.

The fretboard wood has gotten kinda rough over the years. Occasionally I'll give it a good cleaning with some Lemon Oil, but that only makes it smooth and shiny for a short time. Then it just gets gritty again. Would sanding be my best option for making the fretboard feel smooth and playable all the time? Any other options? Thanks
#2
Every time you restring, put a lot of lemon oil on it, not every once in a while.
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#4
you might want to try this stuff called Fret Doctor. A guy turned me on to it a couple years ago, and the stuff works great. I had one old neck that was beginning to pull away from the frets it was so dry when I got it. The fret doctor stuff brought it back to looking nearly new. It's worked much better for me than any lemon oil I've used. I've also been told by old timers that it's not a good idea to over oil a fretboard either.

http://www.beafifer.com/boredoctor.htm
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#5
Really? Too much lemon oil is no good? So when should i really use it? I had used it once and now it seems that everytime i need to change the strings the fretboard needs lemon oil. If that keeps happening and too much of it is no good, what should i do????
©Fleabass5

FreakyStyley
#6
I hope its a rosewood fretboard...

And if its a few years old, well, Squiers aren't made with the best wood in the world. Luckily, you have a bolt on neck. If the problem is too bad, get a new neck. A Warmoth neck on your guitar would probably be pretty damn sweet.
Hi, I'm Peter
#7
I have no clue if it's rosewood or not. It is a squier strat and it's around 8 yrs old. Do you think i could have ruined it???
©Fleabass5

FreakyStyley
#8
I doubt you ruined anything. How often do you change strings? I oil my fretboards every few months, depending how dry the air is.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#9
ive heard many times to not oil your fretboard over 4 times a year and i usually only do mine about twice a year or when it starts looking nasty but yes too much lemon oil is bad for the finish, you could sand down the fretboard and refinish it in nitrocellulose lacquer
#10
Quote by Fleabass5
I have no clue if it's rosewood or not. It is a squier strat and it's around 8 yrs old. Do you think i could have ruined it???


If it's a dark brown colour, it's usually rosewood. If it's black then it's ebony, and if it's a light wood colour then it's maple. These are the usual fretboard woods.
To smooth the fretboard you can use wire wool - a wood shop should be able to advise you on grades and method.
I would advise against any further use of lemon oil. I used to use it, but read that because it's organic, the breakdown products can be bad for the wood. I now use "Bore Oil" (designed for preserving the inner surfaces of wooden clarinets) which is inorganic.
#11
Quote by Erock503
I doubt you ruined anything. How often do you change strings? I oil my fretboards every few months, depending how dry the air is.


Well i usually change the strings whenever i feel I need to. Last time i changed them was around 4 months ago i think.

O and thanx reeced for telling me the different kinds of fretboard woods. I really appreciate it. Yea, my fretboard is a dark brown Color which should be rosewood.
©Fleabass5

FreakyStyley