#1
First of all, sorry for making another mode thread. I swear I've read em all and I have only one question where I am a little confused. Here goes:

Let's say I wanted to play a solo in G Mixolydian. I know that it is the 5th position of the C major scale and that position starts on a G. Now, if I wanted to.. move around the fretboard, would I keep playing the C major scale positions, and just emphatize the G root and third to keep in the mode? A simple yes or no (with explanation ) will suffice.


Thanks for answering
#2
Technically, yes. G Mixolydian is the 5th mode of C Maj, so if you stick with playing C Maj scale positions, then you'll be playing G Mixolydian as well.

You also want to make sure you emphasize the third.

So you are correct, sir, on your hypothesis.
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#3
Keep the seventh emphasised a fair bit too. Each mode has a unique tonality due to notes being arranged differently.

You have three major modes, the Ionian the Lydian and the Mixolydian. Compared to the Ionian, the Lydian has a sharpened fourth and the Mixolydian has a flat seventh. To really bring out the tonality of the scale,s the root, third and that special note must be focused on.

You have three normal minor modes, the Aeolian, the Dorian and the Phyrgian. Compared to the Aeolian, the Dorian has a sharp sixth and the Phyrgian has a flat second, so to bring out the tonality of these minors, the root, third and the special note must be emphasised.

To bring out the tonality of the Locrian, emphasise the root, third and diminished fifth.
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Last edited by Prophet of Page at Jun 21, 2006,
#4
Quote by Prophet of Page
Keep the seventh emphasised a fair bit too. Each mode has a unique tonality due to notes being arranged differently.

You have three major modes, the Ionian the Lydian and the Mixolydian. Compared to the Ionian, the Lydian has a sharpened third and the Mixolydian has a flat seventh. To really bring out the tonality of the scale,s the root, third and that special note must be focused on.

You have three normal minor modes, the Aeolian, the Dorian and the Phyrgian. Compared to the Aeolian, the Dorian has a sharp sixth and the Phyrgian has a flat second, so to bring out the tonality of these minors, the root, third and the special note must be emphasised.

To bring out the tonality of the Locrian, emphasise the root, third and diminished fifth.


lydian has the sharpened fourth...

but yer basically what they said...

i think if you get a couple of backing tracks with different progressions emphasising modes...and then experiment with the scales...it should really click into place and you will really be able to hear each characteristic...
#6
Quote by quinny1089
lydian has the sharpened fourth...

but yer basically what they said...

i think if you get a couple of backing tracks with different progressions emphasising modes...and then experiment with the scales...it should really click into place and you will really be able to hear each characteristic...


Woops. Better watch what I type eh?
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.