#1
Can anyone direct me to a web page with diagrams of powerchords please? I am learning some scales and chords from a book, but no power chords. Thanks.
#3
All power chords have the same fingerings, For example

----------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------
---------------5-----------------------------------------------
---------------5-----------------------------------------------
---------------3-----------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------

Just play that shape anywhere on the neck and you have a Power Chord.
#5
-2-3-4-5-6-
-2-3-4-5-6-
-0-1-2-3-4-


etc.
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#7
yea we all pretty much said the same thing. powerchords are very easy, but dont get too caught up in them. most of the time you will learn them and then thats all you want to play. learn them, and then be done with them until you need them for a song or such.
#8
Power Chords

Power chords are a harmonic interval of a perfect 5th. They are neither minor nor major in their tonality. They are not really chords, as chords are 3 or more notes played simultaneously. A power chord only has 2 (root and 5th), which makes it an interval. Power chords are written in a progression as _5, named after their root note. For example, a D power chord would be written as D5.

Power chords are formed by taking the root and 5th (scale degrees 1 and 5) of the root note's major scale. For example, a C power chord:

..Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
........*.......*.....*


The first and 5th notes are those that comprise a power chord. Therefore, a C power chord is the notes C and G played simultaneously - no more, and no less. You may include octaves of these notes as you see fit to give different sounds to the power chords.

Some common shapes to play power chords are as follows:
e|-----------3--3-------------3--3--------------6-----6----|
B|--------3--3--3-------------x--x--------6--6--6--6--6-6--|
G|--------x--x--0-----5-----5-5--5--5--5--5--5--3--3--3-3--|
D|-----5--5--5--0--5--5--5--5-5--5--3--3--3--3--3-------3--|
A|--5--5--5--5--x--3--3--3--3-3--3-----3--3----------------|
E|--3--3--3--3--3--3--3----------3-------------------------|
....G5.............C5...............F5..........Bb5.........

G5 is notes G D
C5 is notes C G
F5 is notes F C
Bb5 is notes Bb F


-C_Fluff
#9
yea we all pretty much said the same thing. powerchords are very easy, but dont get too caught up in them. most of the time you will learn them and then thats all you want to play. learn them, and then be done with them until you need them for a song or such.


So true, I am living proof of the curse of the powerchord. What it does to you is that it'll make you sound good untill someone else shows you up with what they think is easy. My advice is to learn them and thats it, after that stay as far away as possible, they're unprofessional.
#10
well....powerchords can sound very good...metallica used ALOT...but id try and stay away from them in any morden semi technical genre of music
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#11
A substitute for power chords is also just to play the normal chord (no open chords, they tend to sound bad with dist) and just play the E-A-D or A-D-G strings.
Quote by Ichikurosaki
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#12
Quote by Casmin_Fluffer
Power Chords

Power chords are a harmonic interval of a perfect 5th. They are neither minor nor major in their tonality. They are not really chords, as chords are 3 or more notes played simultaneously. A power chord only has 2 (root and 5th), which makes it an interval. Power chords are written in a progression as _5, named after their root note. For example, a D power chord would be written as D5.

Power chords are formed by taking the root and 5th (scale degrees 1 and 5) of the root note's major scale. For example, a C power chord:

..Note: C D E F G A B C
Degree: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
........*.......*.....*


The first and 5th notes are those that comprise a power chord. Therefore, a C power chord is the notes C and G played simultaneously - no more, and no less. You may include octaves of these notes as you see fit to give different sounds to the power chords.

Some common shapes to play power chords are as follows:
e|-----------3--3-------------3--3--------------6-----6----|
B|--------3--3--3-------------x--x--------6--6--6--6--6-6--|
G|--------x--x--0-----5-----5-5--5--5--5--5--5--3--3--3-3--|
D|-----5--5--5--0--5--5--5--5-5--5--3--3--3--3--3-------3--|
A|--5--5--5--5--x--3--3--3--3-3--3-----3--3----------------|
E|--3--3--3--3--3--3--3----------3-------------------------|
....G5.............C5...............F5..........Bb5.........

G5 is notes G D
C5 is notes C G
F5 is notes F C
Bb5 is notes Bb F


-C_Fluff



SD much?
#14
Ok, I just wanted to learn them, not use them only. Like you guys said, I didn't want to be dependant on them.
#15
Quote by Logz
^ Casmin is SD!

Had my suspisions
Quote by rocknrollstar
"Oh baby baby yes yes YES! YES! *pinch harmonic*"
#16
Quote by Doc_Holiday
So true, I am living proof of the curse of the powerchord. What it does to you is that it'll make you sound good untill someone else shows you up with what they think is easy. My advice is to learn them and thats it, after that stay as far away as possible, they're unprofessional.


How are they unprofessional?
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#17
Quote by Bazilisck311
How are they unprofessional?

Ever heard of "power chord punk?" It's refering to the likes Of Green Day who never play songs that aren't just made up of power chords. They're very often seen as a sort of way of cheating - sounding like you're playing something good to the guitar-impaired but in reality it's just moving the same shape up and down the fretboard.
#18
I love powercords! it's pretty much all I play ...that's not to say I don't wish I could play other more technical and crazy stuff...but I can't...so I am fine with powercords
#19
Quote by bouncingbassist
Ever heard of "power chord punk?" It's refering to the likes Of Green Day who never play songs that aren't just made up of power chords. They're very often seen as a sort of way of cheating - sounding like you're playing something good to the guitar-impaired but in reality it's just moving the same shape up and down the fretboard.


About every very popular rock song is made up of mostly power chords (e.g. Paranoid, Master Of Puppets, ...) with some great riffs and solos over them.
#57 of the Alter Bridge Fan Club
#20
it's just musical snobbery saying power chords are 'unprofessional.' And dumb too. Fine, if you want a wide knowledge of the guitar don't just play power chords, but don't not use them just cos they're too easy.
#21
Quote by bouncingbassist
Ever heard of "power chord punk?" It's refering to the likes Of Green Day who never play songs that aren't just made up of power chords. They're very often seen as a sort of way of cheating - sounding like you're playing something good to the guitar-impaired but in reality it's just moving the same shape up and down the fretboard.


And what exactly is art, color and beauty? They're all illusions just like your "power chord punk" If what you hear sounds good to you, what's to stop it from being real? Just becuase it's an illusion? Is it not genious to take something so simple and use it to create an illusion that's complex enough to please others (if not you)?

Isn't this what we do with our guitars and basses and drums, etc.? We take a musical alphabet of 7 notes and use them to create something well beyond the simplicity of the number. Under this logic of professionalism, I hereby declare music as cheating and therefore unprofessional.

Quote by pabarry777
Fine, if you want a wide knowledge of the guitar don't just play power chords, but don't not use them just cos they're too easy.


So basically, we are not allowed to (forgive the metaphor) make Screwdrivers if we are handed oranges? True genious is creating complexity out of simplicity. If you can create the illusion of complexity by using techniques that are "too easy", then you get my vote for the Nobel Prize.
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Last edited by Bazilisck311 at Jun 21, 2006,
#22
I'm just warning, like drugs, powerchords are addicting. Thats why I say stay away. I spent most of my time play guitar just playing powerchords and simple riffs and I'll tell you I regret it. Besides why must one appretiate something that really isn't so?

Powerchords have no depth like minor and 7th chords, it's just like listening to one note with a lot of tonal background. I'm saying it's like a temperal high, it only sounds good but thats what you're used to listening, and all of a sudden you're limited from playing a much wider veriety of beautiful music because you're so used to playing simple music.

Powerchords are for backup guitarists, I know some of you are okay with it, but like me you'll come to realize it's not good enough, sometimes harder is better. It's okay to learn them. But powerchords can have a sort of "curse" and deprive you of playing anything else.
#23
People who see powerchords as dumb and basic, are just not using them to there full potential
Been away, am back
#24
Quote by Doc_Holiday
I'm just warning, like drugs, powerchords are addicting. Thats why I say stay away. I spent most of my time play guitar just playing powerchords and simple riffs and I'll tell you I regret it. Besides why must one appretiate something that really isn't so?

Powerchords have no depth like minor and 7th chords, it's just like listening to one note with a lot of tonal background. I'm saying it's like a temperal high, it only sounds good but thats what you're used to listening, and all of a sudden you're limited from playing a much wider veriety of beautiful music because you're so used to playing simple music.

Powerchords are for backup guitarists, I know some of you are okay with it, but like me you'll come to realize it's not good enough, sometimes harder is better. It's okay to learn them. But powerchords can have a sort of "curse" and deprive you of playing anything else.


People have different expectations of music. To you, a powerchord may lack the depth of the aforementioned minor and 7th chords. To someone else, they might find the simplicity of the power chord more appealing. Things don't have to be complex and deep to inspire someone.

I'll come to realize that I could create more variety and originality in my music by exploring other, more technical techniques. But I'll never admit that a powerchord, or a 7th chord, or any other form aren't "good enough" for me.

They're not for back-up guitarists, they're not for the less talented and they're not for the less musically trained. They're are for the guitarist who's looking for a catchy sound combined with simplicity to help create that bladder bursting riff or vein-puncturing solo. You wouldn't try to fit an octagon in a slot that's shaped like a triangle, would you?
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#25
Okay I'll admit you have a good point, there are times in playing music where I must use them, but the problem is that they're over used.

Most pop-punk-rock-powerchord songs just sound the same. Why? Because of the powerchords, after using three strings to play songs for while, one might run out of ideas and originality. Sure they're catchy but the veriety is very limited.

Classical artists are the greatest insprations of all time. Artists like Bach, Beethoven, and Pachebel. Practical genouses (forgive my spelling) now lets put powerchords in a piano perspective which are called "double stops" if there nothing but double stops in a song like most rock songs then these artists wouldn't be reconized.

Classical is practically the most beautiful music there is. Even with no lyrics the feeling is expressed through tempo chord variations and the overall tonage of the song or piece.

I'm not bashing anyone who plays powerchords, I'm just saying that it really limits you. I know this through experiance. All I really played was powerchords and then all of a sudden I wanted to play something by Ygnwe J Malmsteen, it just couldn't happen and now I feel like I'm learning the guitar all over again.
Last edited by Doc_Holiday at Jun 22, 2006,
#27
Quote by Doc_Holiday
now lets put powerchords in a piano perspective which are called "double stops"


Since when is a root and a fifth on a piano called a double stop?
#28
Personally I love powerchords, since I love playing with distortion. The thing is I personally try to emphasize vocals in a lot of my music, since it's the most expressive part.

I don't see how that can be called unprofessional. Some of the greatest songs of all time are based off powerchords, if something sounds good why should you back away from it, why move away from something just because it's easy. I really don't think a band like Green Day or any band that uses mostly power chords would be able to play the same kind of music using 7th and 9th chords.

If it sounds good stick with it, thats what I say.
#29
Quote by Doc_Holiday
So true, I am living proof of the curse of the powerchord. What it does to you is that it'll make you sound good untill someone else shows you up with what they think is easy. My advice is to learn them and thats it, after that stay as far away as possible, they're unprofessional.


I wouldn't say they're unprofessional, they do have their place.
#30
a doublestop is a different matter altogether. On a guitar, on the E, A, D, and G strings, or on BOTH THE B and E (not crossing from G to B, then its a bt different), it's the same fret on two adjacent strings. On a guitar, if you do a 'full' powerchord (three strings, 0-2-2-x-x-x), the E and B are root and fifth, and the second E is the octave... but the B and HIGHER E are a doublestop.


Power chords... It all depends on what sound you want. If you're playing, like, CCR, no, don't use them. If you're playing punk, metal, or any other similarly heavy or distorted sound, go right ahead. Just don't rely on them. A good example, in my opinion, is Hang Onto Yourself, by David Bowie, off of Ziggy Stardust. The intro goes D-C-G D-C-G, but the verse is F#-A-B. I play open chords for the intro because, well, it sounds better that way, but I play powerchords on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th frets for the verse, because its easier and sounds heavier. Knowing when to play open, when to play barre, and when to play powerchords is just something you gotta learn.
You know the bitter comes out better on a stolen guitar
You're the BLESSED, we're the Spiders from Mars!

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#31
Quote by Bazilisck311
And what exactly is art, color and beauty? They're all illusions just like your "power chord punk" If what you hear sounds good to you, what's to stop it from being real? Just becuase it's an illusion? Is it not genious to take something so simple and use it to create an illusion that's complex enough to please others (if not you)?

Isn't this what we do with our guitars and basses and drums, etc.? We take a musical alphabet of 7 notes and use them to create something well beyond the simplicity of the number. Under this logic of professionalism, I hereby declare music as cheating and therefore unprofessional.


So basically, we are not allowed to (forgive the metaphor) make Screwdrivers if we are handed oranges? True genious is creating complexity out of simplicity. If you can create the illusion of complexity by using techniques that are "too easy", then you get my vote for the Nobel Prize.


Quoted for truth.
#32
Music to me, honestly I don't care if its power chords, minor, 7th, or any chord / arpegio, if it sounds good, and it expresses what you feel and what you're trying to communicate, it is good. I know that sounds lame, but the point of music and all art is to express, if a loud angry power chord expresses your feeling better then a somber minor chord, why not use the power chord? It's the same as if a simple painting inspires you, why look harder for something more complicated for the sake of complication?
#33
Whether you JUST play powerchords or NEVER play powerchords... either way, you're limiting yourself. NEVER limit yourself.
You know the bitter comes out better on a stolen guitar
You're the BLESSED, we're the Spiders from Mars!

Member 3 of the "Mick Ronson Is an extremely Awesome Guitar Player" Fanclub. PM ThePurpleRabbit to join.
#34
Quote by FadingRoots
Whether you JUST play powerchords or NEVER play powerchords... either way, you're limiting yourself. NEVER limit yourself.


Exactly, do whatever you want.
#35
Yes, because we all know that Black Sabbath songs were crapilly and unprofessionally written. That's why they're not influential at all or anything.


:P
#36
What I'm saying is that people learn them and all of a sudden are dependant on them, just because they sound good. Powerchords arn't the only thing around. I already admit there is a must for them, but still come on, music with powerchords get tiring and repetitive.

There is nothing spontanious in music with them. There is no grow, climax, or groundbreaking resoloution in music thats dependant on powerchords. Thats why classical music is so appretiative, because of the use of CLEVER techniques, not just hard techniques

Different chords and modes have different characters, if one knows how to use them one could create the most inspireing kind of music. Thats why I'm encourageing different chords, they're like powerchords but with a little more character build inside them.

People rely too much on powerchords just because it sounds good but it really won't get you that far. It will not get you in a school jazz band, or a collage school band, and if you just want to get noticed, the odds of becoming successful are slim to none. So you picked

up the guitar, step outside the box and excel in it. Learn everything about it and Powerchords should be only a two week training course.

P.S.FadingRoots thanks for the lesson about double stops I guess I got the wrong Idea about them.