#1
Does anyone know of any books on reading standard notation on guitar? I really need to learn how.
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#3
I learned with a teacher using a Mel Bay series. It's not bad, I guess, but I've never used any other method.

The pieces start off very easy though, so they're good for sight-reading, I was sight-reading almost all of them before I stopped using the books (obviously they probably get a lot harder to sight-read, but I was concentrating on learning jazz chords at the time).

EDIT: Although, I had already learned how to read music from playing piano, so it was an easier adjustment for me. In that case I'm not sure how easy using those books really is.
#4
Mel Bay is great, and if you get more advanced get the realbook.
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#5
True Sight Reading of a guitar piece is simply not feasible in my opinion. Some songs it may be possible, yes, but when you get to technical pieces that have whammy bar interaction, pre-bends, hammer-ons and pull-ofs, slides, natural/pinch/tap harmonics, tremolo picking etc, it's almost impossible.

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#6
^and also, there are multiple ways of playing any one note or chord which mains playing it the very first time you have seen it quite hard.
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#7
Quote by les_paul_01
^and also, there are multiple ways of playing any one note or chord which mains playing it the very first time you have seen it quite hard.


exactly^
#8
I find William Leavitt's A Modern Method for Guitar very helpful!
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#9
Yeah, but Willilam Leavitts book.

But yes, i agree to a certain point very technical guitar is not pssible to read in standard notation on the fly... but you can still get all the information you need from it and then play it.. you should still learn it, it's an valuable skill. i often find those who criticise it, are the ones who cant do it..
#10
Quote by Applehead
But yes, i agree to a certain point very technical guitar is not pssible to read in standard notation on the fly...

With tab, it's also impossible (or at the very least extremely hard) to read technical guitar and play it along on the first time

Also, another advantage of notation:
- Other instruments read them, so you can communicate with them!
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#11
^Exactly. I dislike tab, but i can see it's advantages to someone who doesnt want to be a serious musician. but if you do wanna be one, then sheet music is the way to go. and trust me, sight-reading is hard, but you'll get there.
#12
On a realted note: Does anyone know any good books on guitar theory in general. I'm looking for something incredibly comprehensive, something textbook-ish.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.