#1
Hey I'm writing a song, and I use these chords in it:

F
Gm
A
A#
C
Dm
Em


I was pretty sure my song was in the key of F/Dm...but I thought that the key of F/Dm had the A minor chord not the A major chord, and also had the E diminished chord not the E minor chord. I'm so confused pleeeease help! What key is this really in and if it is F/Dm, then how can these chords fit in it?
Originally posted by josephde
i feel like an idiot, so plz don't flame me, but is hendrix still alive?


Quote by orangecake
I incorporate shred and tapping because i am a technical player, not a simple guitarist.

#2
It looks to me that those chords don't fit in a traditional diatonic key...what you've got there is a more exotic scale than your average western scale. The key of the song can be figured out for yourself, just find the root chord of the progression (the chord that seems to "complete" the phrase). And if it really is F, you can call it the F hendrix513 scale until you find out what the correct name is!
#3
A comes from D harmonic minor. D harmonic minor has a C# instead of C, hence the A major chord. Em comes from D Dorian. D Dorian has B instead of Bb.


In this case, you can't call it A#. It must be called Bb.
#4
First off all, you should call A# Bb instead, because that's the "proper way." Now, to answer you're question.

In classical music, it's pretty common actually to use the V chord in a minor key and make it a major chord. Just like you did here. I don't know if you've heard of natural, harmonic, and melodic minor, so if you haven't, I'll explain them. Sorry if I'm telling you sh1t you already know, but I don't know how much you learned about this stuff.

D natural minor key:
D E F G A Bb C D

Just like F major, yeah, you know this

D harmonic minor:
D E F G A Bb C# D

The same as natural minor, except that you sharp the 7th chord. This becomes the leading tone, because it has such as strong pull to go up to the D note. If you play the scale, you'll hear a sorta egyptian sound to it. But maybe that's just me.

D melodic minor:
D E F G A B(natural) C# D C Bb A G F E D

going up, you sharp the 6th and 7th note, and going down you "flat them back down to normal."


So, that's why minor is so much more interesting and you can make so many more chords out of it. Now the V chord (in the case of D minor, A is the V chord), you can make either minor or major. A, C, and E make up the A triad, so if you use a C natural, it's minor, and if you use the natural minor scale and use the C#, it becomes major.

Same goes with the Em chord. Yes, normally it would be diminished (E, G, Bb), but if you use the melodic minor scale, you can use the Bnatural to make it a minor chord.

Hopefully that helped
Oh ho, everyday is an adventure
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
A comes from D harmonic minor. D harmonic minor has a C# instead of C, hence the A major chord. Em comes from D Dorian. D Dorian has B instead of Bb.


In this case, you can't call it A#. It must be called Bb.

Sorry, I probably sound like an idiot right now..... but either I'm overlooking something and am just not seeing it right now, or I just don't know how the hell this works (which is more likely the case)... so how does a C# instead of a C bring forth the A major chord, and a B instead of a Bb bring forth a Em chord?


EDIT: thanks BigCheese, that helped a lot

2EDIT: yup, thanks to BigCheese I just realized that I was overlooking that whole C# to C thing
Originally posted by josephde
i feel like an idiot, so plz don't flame me, but is hendrix still alive?


Quote by orangecake
I incorporate shred and tapping because i am a technical player, not a simple guitarist.

Last edited by hendrix513 at Jun 21, 2006,
#6
Fvck my computer, I hope this doesn't double post. Again, I'm not sure how much you know, but I figure I'd let you know.

To make a minor triad:

1. Use the root note (A in this case).
2. Go up three half steps (also called a minor 3rd), which gives you a C in this case
3. Go up four half steps (also called a major 3rd), which gives you an E in this case.

So you get A, C, and E.


To make a major triad, you reverse steps 2 and 3.

1. Use the root note (A)
2. Go up four half steps (or a major 3rd) which gives you a C#
3. go up three half steps (or a minor 3rd) which gives you an E

so, you get A, C#, E... which is an A major triad.
Oh ho, everyday is an adventure