#1
What would a chord of this shape be called?

2244xx


It's 2 Bs and 2 F#s (Perfect fifth of B).

For personal reference I've called it a "double fifth octave" (There's 2 fifths and one octave of the "root" [Whch wouldn't be on the lowest string] note). But I'm just wondering what its technical name would be?

Anyone any idea? I've searched the chord thread and haven't found it, so I'm not sure; can it even be used as a chord? I took it from notes in the G# Aeolian scale when looking around to see what "new" chords I could use and found this; so yeah. Any help would be appreciated .
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#2
it can be taken from minor scales and major scales, even pentetonic, its qust a powerchord mate with an extra fith on the bottom. It can be used as a chord definitly, but you might want to look for something more interesting.
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#5
B5/F# would be the correct way of writing it. but all it sounds like is a grungy powerchord.
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#6
F#4
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#7
Quote by les_paul_01
B5/F# would be the correct way of writing it. but all it sounds like is a grungy powerchord.


well it actually is a powerchord, only 2 tones so not a real chord...
#8
"Power chord" normally refers to a X5 interval
This is a X4 interval.
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Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
It's can be a contraction and genitive case.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
If you cut down on these costs students won't learn so well, effecting the "quality"...
#9
Quote by frenchyfungus
"Power chord" normally refers to a X5 interval
This is a X4 interval.

x4 interval

Wouldn't say so
I II III IV V 
B C# D#  E  F#


the B5 is powerchord

e---    ---
B---    ---
G---    ---
D--- or -4- etc
A-9-    -2-
E-7-    ---
Last edited by HiromiBodom at Jun 21, 2006,
#12
split it into 2 sections.
Your first section is this:
x244xx

Your second section is this:
2xxxxx


Name each one;
1) Powerchord -> Root note: B -> Chord name: B5
2) Bass Note -> Note name: F#


Now, chords which have bass notes are called slash chords. This is because they have a slash in the name to indicate where the bass note is.

They follow this formula:
'Chord Name' / 'Bass Note'


Apply this formula to those names above, and you get this as your chord name:

B5/F#


EDIT: to the user above me.
Id be inclined to call it B5/F# and not B5.
This is because you can hear that it is actually a B5 powerchord, except, you can also notice an extra bassier note.

Its all about tonality etc.
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#13
Quote by HiromiBodom
x4 interval

Wouldn't say so
I II III IV V 
B C# D# E F#


the B5 is powerchord

e---    ---
B--- ---
G--- ---
D--- or -4- etc
A-9- -2-
E-7- ---

Well, I think it would be an F#sus4 (since there's no 3rd) or a B5/F#.
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