#1
what is the best way to learn how to play in a different time instead of 4/4. e.g like 5/4 or 7/8. are there any good songs that consists of 5/4 or 7/8
#2
Quote by jtll24
what is the best way to learn how to play in a different time instead of 4/4. e.g like 5/4 or 7/8. are there any good songs that consists of 5/4 or 7/8
This song is pretty old, but I think Jethro Tull's Living in the Past is about as good an example of 5/4 time as you're likely to find.
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#3
Money by pink floyd, if I'm not mistaken, is in 7/8. Somebody correct me if i'm wrong, but I think I'm right.
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#4
"money" by pink floyd is a great example of 7/8
and i believe "The Crunge" by led zeppelin is in either 5/4 or 9/8, as well as 4/4
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#5
tool has a lot of odd time signatures... if you're into tool

also breaking down time signatures when counting them if possible is a great way to think about things
7/8 can be (1-2-3) (1-2) (1-2) or (1-2-3) (1-2-3-4) depending on the accents etc
#6
Quote by jtll24
what is the best way to learn how to play in a different time instead of 4/4. e.g like 5/4 or 7/8. are there any good songs that consists of 5/4 or 7/8

The best way to learn is to get the root beat down. Like in 7/8 there are 7 beats in a bar, and the 8th note gets the beat. The same goes for 5/4 five beats per measure, quarter not gets the beat. its not too hard
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#8
I find the easiest way to do it is just learn the melody of the part of the song you're trying to play. That way, if you know how the melody goes in your head, you won't have to think much about having to play in an odd time.
#9
Quote by phoenix_88
tool has a lot of odd time signatures... if you're into tool

also breaking down time signatures when counting them if possible is a great way to think about things
7/8 can be (1-2-3) (1-2) (1-2) or (1-2-3) (1-2-3-4) depending on the accents etc

yeah, the groupings are key. like in Dave Brubeck's "Take Five," which is in 5/4, it the beat is clearly (1,2,3)(1,2). So you could think of it as putting an emphasis at the beginning of each grouping, and a bigger emphasis at the beginning of each measure. Of course don't exaggerate it too much, but you get the idea.
#10
I prefer to think of them as a whole bar rather than breaking them down. So in 5/4 I would count 1-2-3-4-5. This way I find that I really retrain my mind to think in terms of 5/4 instead of 4/4 +1 or 2/4 and 3/4 stuck together. Same for everything, 7/8 11/8 9/8. Yeah, listen to Tool, it's uncommon to find a 4/4 song by Tool.
#11
Or play without tapping your foot. Youd be surprisred how creative you can get.
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#12
the mission impossible theme is in 5/4 time.
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#13
Dream Theater are a good place to start if you're trying to find some do-able weird time signatures. I've never had any trouble with playing in them, and I think this is probably just because I've got used to them; so much music I listen to uses them. :P It's just a matter of not thinking of it as being "a weird time signature" but "another time signature." Listening to music with frequent changes in meter makes this a lot easier and more natural.
#14
Quote by Dan Steinman
yeah, the groupings are key. like in Dave Brubeck's "Take Five," which is in 5/4, it the beat is clearly (1,2,3)(1,2). So you could think of it as putting an emphasis at the beginning of each grouping, and a bigger emphasis at the beginning of each measure. Of course don't exaggerate it too much, but you get the idea.



Blue Rondo a La Turk off the same album is an even better one, Its in 9/8 which is nothing too strange, but its accented as (1,2)(1,2)(1,2)(1,2,3) with every third bar being the regular (1,2,3)(1,2,3)(1,2,3)


and to add to all the progressive stuff that has been mentioned Opeth like doing some odd things quiet a lot (most of their songs are in compound time as 12/8 or 9/8 and they go into wierder stuff, particulary on Deliverance)


edit:
heres a list of stuff to get you going
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_works_in_irregular_time_signatures
Last edited by seljer at Jun 22, 2006,
#15
Listen to "Disappear" by Dream theater. It's a great example of a song in 5/8 that changes to 6/8 timing and back again.
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