#1
what does it mean to be classically trained in guitar? How does this style differ from just playing?
#2
well try playing ain't talking about love first and then caprice 5. whole difference huh? it's just a certain style that gives you a different emotion.
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#3
who are those songs by? I am interested in hearing some classicaly trained songs if someone can Yousendit.
#5
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4877710728748067045&q=segovia

THAT'S some classical guitar. Segovia was shredding on guitar years before Satch, Petrucci, Vai, or any of them. It takes a lot of discipline, knowledge of music theory, and proper finger technique. It takes quite a while to learn classical guitar. The manner in which you hold the guitar is different, the sound you get from your fingers on nylon strings is different, and the kind of theory you'll need is different.
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at Jun 22, 2006,
#6
it's mainly associtaed with the fingerpicking style on a nylon string guitar, think mexican music.
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#7
actually i associate it personally with flamenco style and classical guitar playing such as mozart and chopin played on a classical guitar
#8
The mechanics of classical guitar is basically what bangoodcharlotte said. The music is just traditional classical pieces. No strumming, and shredding usually isn't a part of it - that's more for flamenco.
#9
^ Not true really, I've seen pieces that are strummed; it's more common in duet parts/group pieces, but there's some other music that calls for it. And I'm not sure what you consider shred, but there are some pieces out there that are pretty damned fast.
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#10
yes there are definately some pieces that are VERY fast, i think another defining point of classical guitar is the bass and treble cleffs being played simultaneously..... i've never heard or seen a classical piece that doesn't have this (and if anyone can name one please let me know as i have heard a TON of songs and it seems very dominant in the style)
#11
^ Played very fast, but not played in the traditional "shred" style.

You can fingerpick a piece at a very fast pace, but that's not necessarily shred.

The bass/treble-at-the-same-time is mainly the reason behind this.
#12
I like to think of classical guitar as more like this...

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8725540685439152718&q=paganini

...that's pretty badass.

But seriously though, to be classicaly trained means more like an understanding of classical guitar. That's all. Randy Rhoads was classically trained. That's the first example that comes to my head, I'm sure there are many others.
#14
it's a guitar style in which the songs are played with bass lines and melody played on the same guitar. it's very much based on arpeggiation and is many times played with the fingers, though alot can be played with a pick.
#16
if you wanna play classical music, get a damn violin. the classical guitar repertoire is very limited, mostly consisting of arrangements of violin or piano pieces, very old lute music, or the work of a handful of spanish composers who come nowhere near bach, beethoven, etc. The discipline, presicion and virtuosity that comes with classical training is extremely useful and can be applied to other genres of music, but if you want to seriously pursue classical music, guitar has a very limited classical repertoire and is much harder to make a classical career with than strings, horns, or woodwinds.
#17
Quote by Dan Steinman
if you wanna play classical music, get a damn violin. the classical guitar repertoire is very limited, mostly consisting of arrangements of violin or piano pieces, very old lute music, or the work of a handful of spanish composers who come nowhere near bach, beethoven, etc. The discipline, presicion and virtuosity that comes with classical training is extremely useful and can be applied to other genres of music, but if you want to seriously pursue classical music, guitar has a very limited classical repertoire and is much harder to make a classical career with than strings, horns, or woodwinds.

Yep. You have to look like the bastard child of Johnny Cash and zorro to go anywhere with classical guitar. I'm sure. And seriously, Carcassi and Sor weren't even comparable to Kurt Cobain. I'm cereal. Super Cereal. And it's not opinion, it's fact. totally.
#19
Classical guitar playing is not only fingerstyle on a nylon stringed guitar. It also includes flatpicking (just look at some Caracassi compositions). The only limit is the classical idiom, which is very wide. I have only one complaint about classical music, and that's its attitude towards improvisation. As a starter, learn some baroque pieces (the cliche of classical guitar). Bach's peices are quite nice. To be classically trained means to be trained in the idiom of European classical music.

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#20
My lessons in classical guitar have helped me improve nearly every aspect of my playing. And not only the playing itself but also my understanding of music theory and songwriting (Writing actual music, not lyrics). And I've grown to like some classical music that I wouldn't have listend to before, so based on my own experience I can say that classical training is really useful for any guitarist.