#1
I've had this question for a while now. If you want to change modes within one song, do you change from G Ionian to D mixolydian or from G Lydian to D Lydian?
Please help!!!
Last edited by AceRoom at Jun 25, 2006,
#3
Well I think you must have made a few typos, but I think I understand what you're asking. You're asking how to switch modes in a G major song. Well in my opinion there is no set "way" of doing things. That's why we call it Music theory and not something like Music Fact heh. So when you're playing the song just play whatever mode fits or sounds good, and if you're trying to be like a jazz player then you'll have to switch modes for almost every chord. So in G major you'd play G Ionian for G, D Mixolydian for the D chord, and C Lydian for the C chord. Your question was kinda vague and I'm not sure if that's what you were asking. Well hope it helped anyways. Peace
You've just been graveled!!!
#4
Quote by Slik101
Well I think you must have made a few typos, but I think I understand what you're asking. You're asking how to switch modes in a G major song. Well in my opinion there is no set "way" of doing things. That's why we call it Music theory and not something like Music Fact heh. So when you're playing the song just play whatever mode fits or sounds good, and if you're trying to be like a jazz player then you'll have to switch modes for almost every chord. So in G major you'd play G Ionian for G, D Mixolydian for the D chord, and C Lydian for the C chord. Your question was kinda vague and I'm not sure if that's what you were asking. Well hope it helped anyways. Peace
No no no, the Jazz player would do G Ionian for g, D Lydian for D, and C Ionian for C.


Yes, that is allowed. It goes out of key, but it's allowed.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jun 23, 2006,
#5
My question is that the different modes in one key (ex: G Ionian, E Aoelian) have the same notes right? So what is the difference?
That's why I'm asking if you are supposed use the same intervals or mode for all the root notes. Like in the G major key, G lydian, A lydian, B lydian, etc.
#6
yes they all have the same notes , BUT and this is a very big but, each mode has a different root or tonal center. the root should sound like home.
the modes in order are.

Ionian mode
Dorian mode
phrygian mode
Lydian mode
Mixolydian mode
Aeolian mode
Locrian mode
"I" "D"on't "P"lay "L"icks "M"y "A"untie "L"ikes

the notes in the g maj scale are G-A-B-C-D-E-F#.

To get the modes in the key of G just start at a different note in its maj scale.

G ionian(first mode)(maj scale) Would have the notes G-A-B-C-D-E-F#
A dorian (2nd mode) will start from the second note in the G maj scale. therefore the notes are A-B-C-D-E-F#-G.
you can do the above with all the other modes.

so why use modes when they have the same notes in a certain key?
well, they do but modes are special because each one has a different interval structure.
modes are used for there unique sound.

do some searches on modes. once you get it they're awsome
hope this helped.
#7
How do you put emphasis on the root of the mode? That's what makes the song sound at home right?


P.S. Thanks for the Acronym
#8
you hold it longer than the other notes.

when u solo you dont play all the notes as 16th notes or whatever.

i mean that u should let those minor notes stand out.
#9
Can you give me an example of a song that uses different modes? Also, are modes only used in solos or in all aspects of the song?
#10
no sorry dude i dont learn alot of songs i mostly jam with jam tracks. but i know other dudes will be happy to sow u some of these songs.

modes are used to construct chords and what not. for instance. if im in the key of G i can play A dorian right. so i can play Am in the key of G cause Am is in the A dorian mode. u can use modes to come up with really cool progressions.

like if i play a progression like Bm-Cmaj-Dmaj-Cmaj-Bm, play it, it sounds spanish right, not major, but its in the key of G. so those chords are from the B phrygian mode which has a spanish flavour, and the notes in those chords are all found in the G maj scale, but B C and D gets emphasis, B being the root.
#11
I understand that they can be used in chord construction but i don't really get the how they are used in solos. Is it related to the fingering patters?
#12
say ur in the key of Gmaj with a chord progression like Am Em Bm7 then if you soloing with A dorian the note G should lead to D. it should sound unfinished if you stop ur solo on G.
D should be the TONAL CENTER.

of course, i cant explain this as well as other dudes who teach guitar and have alot of experience. check out the modes lesson at guitarlessonworld.com and at zenteo guitar lessons.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No no no, the Jazz player would do G Ionian for g, D Lydian for D, and C Ionian for C.

Are you serious? The Dchord in this case is a D7, therefore clashing with the 7 in lydian. Also, the Cchord would probably be played as a Cmaj7#11, so Lydian would be the guess of (my) choice here I personally like the sound of lydian more than that of ionian, so I'd play Glydian over G, Dhalf-whole over D and Clydian over C.
#14
So since Lydian is has a major 3rd, you could play that over any major chord?
#15
No, not over any major chord. Lydian is 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 so anything with those (and only those) notes in it can be seen as lydian. For example, something like Cmajor7 can be seen as lydian, since it has 1 3 5 7. If you take it as C7, it has 1 3 5 b7, meaning Lydian will clash (the 7 mostly). Something like Cmaj7#11 is Lydian all the way! 1 3 5 7 #11 (which is #4) so that's an obvious choice