#1
I was wondering what are chords like this called and how are they constructed?

e-------7------12--------5
b-------8------13--------5
g-------7------14--------6
d---------------------------
a---------------------------
E---------------------------


In the summer issue of total guitar, John Frusciante described them as 'Inverted' chords and said he used them a lot on stadium arcadium. He gave an explanation but wasn't exactly clear.

Help?

M
#2
I think inverted chords are just when you take the notes of a chord in a different order by changing the root note. Like if you took C (C, E, G) you could play it in a different position, with E as the root note so it would be E, G, C.

Note: This may be wrong. I don't know what I'm talking about.
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#3
He said something like that, you just flip it upside down and mess around with it i think. If anyone has a better explanation, please post.

Cheers
#4
They're look like bits or chords being played instead of the whole thing. For example, the first one you posted is the top 3 notes of a D shape chord moved up the neck. The whole thing would be :
e--7--------------------
b--8--------------------
g--7--------------------
d--5--------------------
a----------------------
E----------------------

But he's omitting the 5 since u already have a G in there (8 on b). That'd just be a G btw.
Second one looks like the top half of an Am shape, It'd be a an Am actually just all the way up the neck I think. Third one I think is just the top half of an E barre shape, Amaj is what he's playing I think. Granted I'm not 100%, but that's what it looks like
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#5
are you talking about when he takes his thumb and barres the E string so that he can have more freecdom to do hammer ons and pull offs with his other finger?
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#7
^ ok because I saw that Guitar World thing and he was explaining why he does that aswell
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#8
Quote by HuskerDu
I think inverted chords are just when you take the notes of a chord in a different order by changing the root note. Like if you took C (C, E, G) you could play it in a different position, with E as the root note so it would be E, G, C.

Note: This may be wrong. I don't know what I'm talking about.


That's correct!

Triads have a two inversions as far as I know...

Take Cmaj for example.

Cmaj - C E G.
1st inversion - E G C.
2nd inversion - G C E.

When you invert chords, a certain transition of intervals happens - that's why they sound so different.
#9
Cheers for you help. And to clear up the problem about guitar world, its because guitar world is total guitar's sister mag.
Total guitar= English
Guitar World=American
Cheers guys
#14
Kind of off-topic, but if you ever wanna play ska or reggae, those chord shapes are perfect.
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