#1
I'm new at this, so please dont make fun of me because I have no idea what i'm talking about.

I'm learning scales on Cyberfret.com.

According to the website

1. WWHWWWH is the pattern for notes in a major scale.

2.This is the pattern for every Major Scale
http://www.cyberfret.com/scales/primer/images/major-horizontal.gif

3. Also according to them, the notes in a Cmajor scales would be "CDEFGABC"

4. I tried this out.. and on the bottom string there is "B" note right beside of the root note on the bottom string. Someone help?
#2
Yeah, the B is supposed to be there. The half step is only one fret, from A-2 to A-3
#3
It just has a blank spot and then the bottom root C note though.. i'm confused. is the diagram wrong? the D on the right side top isn't there either
#4
Quote by jeremy00
It just has a blank spot and then the bottom root C note though.. i'm confused. is the diagram wrong?


You're looking at it as a pattern rather than a scale. The pattern you have shows the notes in two octaves in a specific patten on the fretboard... that's not to say you can't use the B note on the E string, it's just not indicated as a part of that pattern.

You can use the notes C D E F G A B anywhere on the fretboard and still remain in the key of C... the pattern you have is just a cluster of notes arranged from C to C in two octaves. You'll find there's patterns all over the fretboard.

That's why seeing scales as patterns really isn't a good idea, you should view them as notes & intervals as opposed to these finger patterns you're supplied with. They help, yes - but ultimately you should aim towards seeing scales as notes all over the fretboard as opposed to just one restriced pattern.
#5
Do you have any idea where i could get a lesson with scales as notes instead of just the patterns? Or even a thing that shows me what to practice?

Edit: So what your saying.. is the there is 6 roots in the Cmajor scale?
Last edited by jeremy00 at Jun 23, 2006,
#6
Quote by jeremy00
Do you have any idea where i could get a lesson with scales as notes instead of just the patterns? Or even a thing that shows me what to practice?

Edit: So what your saying.. is the there is 6 roots in a 1-12 scale?


You can try something like this which shows you all the notes of any given scale across the fretboard - while it's useful, you're much better off learning the notes & intervals and seeing them as just that, notes on the fretboard, and not patterns.

And no, there's only one 'root' in the Cmajor scale... but, there's three C notes (roots) in the pattern you're studying.
#7
Frets 1-12, sorry for not being describable. Ooh. I kinda get the root thing. Is the root always on the Low E string then?
Last edited by jeremy00 at Jun 23, 2006,
#8
Quote by jeremy00
Frets 1-12, sorry for not being describable. Ooh. I kinda get the root thing. Is the root always on the Low E string then?


No! There's two root notes per scale on each string. That is, one root note per octave. From fret 1 - 24 on the E string, there's two C notes (Fret 8 and 20), for example.

But, what I'm trying to do is convince you to stay away from thinking of them as exactly that - patterns & frets - but to think of them as notes (C D E F G A B) and intervals (1 2 3 4 5 6 7) - perhaps, you should just learn that particular pattern of the C major scale for finger independence and dexterity, while learning more basic theory such as octaves, semi-tones & intervals - then see if you understand how scales apply across the whole fretboard, as opposed to finger patterns.

Here's a good lesson to get you started.
#9
ok. i'll read this.. really long lesson. Can I PM if I have any questions? Thanks for the help too. Very much appreciated
#10
It's long yes... but the first half or so shouldn't be too hard to get to grips with - it's a very digestable lesson, so I thought it'd apply to you.

Sure you can PM me, but it's your choice - chances are you're better off re-posting in this thread if you're still having problems, or making a new thread on a different topic if you get stuck - most of the guys on here are alot more knowledgeable than me, so it'd do you good to get more than one perspective on a particular problem.