#1
So maybe u guys can help me out with this question.
Any help will be appreciated.

my guess is if there is something like A Dorian pent. . Then i would say it will have the same notes as G maj pent.

just a simple yes or no will help.

jaco
#4
Yes, I think so. I don't really know the names, though, I think it's minor pentatonic, major pentatonic, neutral pentatonic... and then I'm not sure what the others would be called.
#6
This is what i mean:

the notes in the Gmaj scale are G-A-B-C-D-E-F#, right. so the Gmaj pentatonic has the notes G-A-B-D-E, cutting out C and F#.

so now, A dorian has the notes A-B-C-D-E-F#-G. If i take away the notes C and F#. will i have A dorian pentatonic?: A-B-D-E-G?????
#7
Why the hell would you call something like that dorian pentatonic? The whole point of dorian is the b3 and the 6 and those are exactly the ones you take away..
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#8
Hmm, perhaps you want modal pentatonics? Here's an explanation courtest of SD... I mean, C_Fluff

Quote by Casmin_Fluffer
Cas posted on this a while back with a great explanation but I can't seem to find it.

Anyway, it has to do with the ambiguity of the scales - if you eliminated the 4th and 7th from the Lydian and Mixolydian modes they'd sound identical to the major pentatonic - so using the pentatonic scales inclusive of these characteristics is important.

Basically, the idea is to apply the scale degrees (NOT INTERVALS) of the minor pentatonic to the various major modes and vice versa.

Doing so results in this:
Ionian pentatonic: 1 3 4 5 7 1
Dorian pentatonic: 1 2 b3 5 6 1
Phrygian pentatonic: 1 b2 b3 5 b6 1
Lydian pentatonic: 1 3 #4 5 7 1
Mixolydian pentatonic: 1 3 4 5 b7 1
Aeolian pentatonic: 1 2 b3 5 b6 1
Locrian pentatonic: 1 b2 b3 b5 b6 1 (not sure about this one)

And of course, the major and minor pentatonics.
Major pentatonic: 1 2 3 5 6 1
Minor pentatonic: 1 b3 4 5 b7 1

-SD


(^ Note the signature )

Aand more explaining...

Quote by Casmin_Fluffer
Straight memorization would be effective, but I think it's important that you also learn how to derive them, which I didn't really explain, raWrgh! Also, there's some slightly wrong info that I changed in the above post.

Anywho, how in the world do I get those wacky modal pentatonics?

Well, it comes from applying the scale degrees of the minor pentatonic to the major modes and vice versa!

Our first mode is Ionian - a major mode since it forms a major chord (1 3 5). Thus we'll be applying the scale degrees of the minor pentatonic.

   Natural Minor: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1 
Minor pentatonic: 1 b3 4 5 b7 1
Scale Degrees: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1


As you can see, the minor pentatonic is taking scale DEGREES (not INTERVALS!) 1 3 4 5 7 of the scale.

If we apply those scale DEGREES to the Ionian mode, we come out with intervals 1 3 4 5 7 - which is the Ionian pentatonic scale.

We can apply these scale DEGREES to the other major modes - Lydian and Mixolydian.

Lydian
Lydian: 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1
Degrees: 1 3 4 5 7 1

Lydian pentatonic intervals: 1 3 #4 5 7 1

Mixolydian
Mixolydian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1
Degrees: 1 3 4 5 7 1

Mixolydian pentatonic intervals: 1 3 4 5 b7 1


The opposite happens for the minor modes?

           Major: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
Major pentatonic: 1 2 3 5 6 1
Scale Degrees: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1



As you can see, the major pentatonic is taking scale DEGREES 1 2 3 5 6 of the major scale.

Applying these to the minor modes (ones that form a minor chord - 1 b3 5) and you get this:

Dorian
Lydian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1
Degrees: 1 2 3 5 6 1

Dorian pentatonic intervals: 1 2 b3 5 6 1

Phrygian
Phrygian: 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Degrees: 1 2 3 5 6

Phrygian pentatonic intervals: 1 b2 b3 5 b6 1

Aeolian
Aeolian: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Degrees: 1 2 3 5 6

Aeolian pentatonic intervals: 1 2 b3 5 b6 1


Locrian, being a diminished mode, can swing both ways. That means Locrian pentatonic can either be:
Locrian pent: 1 b2 b3 b5 b6 1
Locrian pent: 1 b3 b4 b5 b7 1

Got any questions?

I'm not all the way through Jazz Theory; I'm not altogether sure if it covers this or not. It's a great resource though!

-SD


If you have any questions... ask C_Fluff, lol. I don't currently use any of this at all.
#9
Meh, I still don't think you should call them that.. I am a firm believer that pentatonics are used as some sort of a simplification if you're unsure about what mode to use. For example, if I gave you two chords, C and F for example, than those could be in the scale of C and the scale of F. So, in the scale of C, you'd use Cionian and Flydian. In the scale of F, you'd use Flydian and Cmixolydian. If you'd write those out you'll see that the only difference is the B-Bb note.

A possibility in such a case would be to use Cmajor pentatonic and Fmajor pentatonic over it. Neither of those scales has a Bb or B, so there would be no 'wrong' note.

Anyways, if you'd write out this sort of thing.. You see that all the majorish modes (modes with a 1 3 5) have the 1 2 3 5 6 notes in common, which is EXACTLY what the major pentatonic is!
Ionian:     1 2 3  4 5 6  7 1
Lydian:     1 2 3 #4 5 6  7 1
Mixolydian: 1 2 3  4 5 6 b7 1
Maj penta:  1 2 3    5 6    1


It's exactly the same with the minor scales (scales with 1 b3 5), seeing as they have the 1 b3 4 5 b7 in common and that's what the minor pentatonic is!

Aeolian:    1  2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Dorian:     1  2 b3 4 5  6 b7 1
Phrygian:   1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Min penta:  1    b3 4 5    b7 1


And that's what brings me to the point of the pentatonic scales, they are only useful if you're not too sure what to use. That's the example with the C F, which I gave you in the beginning!

If I'd say it's C F G, then you'd use Cionian over C, Flydian over F and Gmixolydian over G. You KNOW that there aren't clashing notes, so why would you limit yourself to something like Flydian pentatonic over F? You have the same notes in Flydian (and more), so I'd say just use Flydian if you know you can use it.

Of course, the modal pentatonics aren't wrong.. Just limiting imo.