#1
There was a recent article that got knocked because the writer talked about how you need to put emotion into the music, but some readers felt that he was being stupid for believing that he can write music with emotion. What do you people think? Can music be emotional, or is it inherently bland, conjuring emotions in the listener?
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#2
Music is emotion..music is...everything. The only way a song can conjure is emotions in the listener is if the writer is putting thoe emotions into it...
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#3
I don't think music is literally emotional, yet it does express the emotions of the artist who wrote the piece. Even pieces without any vocals or written lyrics can express emotion just in the way the piece was composed. (dynamics, etc...)
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#4
Quote by unconstrained60
Music is emotion..music is...everything. The only way a song can conjure is emotions in the listener is if the writer is putting thoe emotions into it...


Agreed, same as any other kind of art form.
#5
Quote by unconstrained60
Music is emotion..music is...everything. The only way a song can conjure is emotions in the listener is if the writer is putting thoe emotions into it...


Very true, and also in the same way other emotions that were not "put into" the song by the artist can be felt by the listener.
#6
i'm not exactly sure what you mean. i think, for me at least, its because theres the association in my mind that in order for music to elicit an emotional response in a listener the music must inherently be emotional. i dont think anyone's gonna start crying to Mary Had a Little Lamb (except for those with a traumatizing childhood involving that song ). likewise, i could easily see people crying or being scared listening to Mozart's Requiem (my friend had to stop the CD of the Requiem after a few songs...she said the choir scared her).

also on that note, the minor keys are inherently sad/dark...but not everyone can write a song that's actually emotive using a minor key, it depends very much on the skill and emotion of the composer/writer.

however, personal experiences and personality obviously play into the response...(for simplicity's sake, i'll use sadness as "emotion"). for example, someone who's never been through a painful break up may not find some break up songs all that sad at all. if they do find it sad, it might be because they can empathize with the singer's condition. or again, maybe it's because the blatantly singer puts his/her heart on their sleeve, Conor Oberst of Bright Eyes immediately comes to mind. or lets flip that...a song may never have the intent to be sad, but because of an experience in a person's life, they might associate the song with a sad event in their life (like...the song came on the radio when they found out a person died)...or the content of the song itself makes the association to that event, although for most people the content of the song may not be sad.

soooo basically...my post covers a lot of the logical possibilities without any conclusion that's mostly because i dont know what the question is...and just in general, i dont know if there can be a solid answer to that. so much of it depends on the person and their experiences.


(btw...i'm not sure this is in the right thread...)
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Last edited by phobos at Jun 25, 2006,
#7
Wow...I just realized how many typos I made..haha..sorry..I'm exhausted...I was at a concert from 12-5 then came home and had band practice.haha
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#8
i don't think there needs to be emotion in music, however emotion is what makes music beautiful and worthwhile.
#9
Music is an art form that requires contribution from the composer, the musician playing the piece of music, and the listener. The level of emotion in music depends on all three people (two if the composer also plays the piece he or she has written). Something may be composed and played really joyfully, but how it is actually interpreted depends on the listener.
#10
that's mostly because i dont know what the question is...


I was simply surprised by the harsh, apathetic stance taken by the reviewers of a particular article. They felt that music, in itself, was completely devoid of emotion. It was simply sound waves played in a certain sequence. This surprised me because of how literal, scientific, and frankly inhuman it was. To analyze the science of music and talk about emotion seems pretty hypocritical to me. I've always seen music as more than high frequency vibrations played in a certain order, because that's just sound. Music, to me, has always meant the way that these bland vibrations and waves make you feel. I wanted to know where others stood on this topic.

I hope I managed to clear this up for you. If you want to see for yourself what I'm talking about, I believe it was the "Writing Emotional Solos" article/lesson on the main ultimate guitar page. I'm not dead sure on the name of the article/lesson, but it was something to that extent.

(btw...i'm not sure this is in the right thread...)


Yeah, I didn't have a damn clue where to put it, but this seemed to be the most musical area that revolved around instruments as opposed to vocals. If it needs to get moved, then that's cool with me.
Quote by Powerhouse
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#11
ok, i understand now. i just listened to something on NPR where an astrophysicist talked about how Mozart's music is so appealing because it literally on a mathematical level has symmetry. he started to elaborate on it, but it fell short of being adequate for me.

humans are more than molecules. in fact, the net worth of the pure elements contained in humans, if we could separate them out, would cost less than a few dollars. when the sum of parts becomes something far greater than the components, science and numbers cease to explain it sufficiently (even biology and psychology fail at some point in the explaination of human function and behavior).

music is the same. if music were simply an extension of physics, a computer would be enough to make all the music we listen to. a computer probably has the "intelligence" to asssemble harmonies and melodies in a sensical matter according to a formula. but a formula, at least the kind a computer would understand, would be insufficient in creating something truly emotional or meaningful. and let's not forget that the (Western) standards of harmony and musical consonance were established by humans...

in fact, if one chose to ignore the metaphysical significance of art and deconstruct it to the point of scientific analysis, it would ruin the meaning of art, eliminate its very purpose, and overall just be petty. the subjective nature of art makes it what it is. just like the emotional response is determined by the personal experiences of each individual person.

personally, i'm very intrigued by the physics of music. it's one of the reason's im going into electrical engineering and with music recording. but the thing is, i understand the value of music lies in everything except the science. but i believe science can be used to further the condition of the art, improve and spread its enjoyment, and create new mediums of expression.
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#12
Music in my opinion, and the reason I love it so much, is for the fact that it is full of emotion! I think the reason the columnist got jumped so heavily is that nowadays the majority of music studios do not see it as a form of expressing ones self. They see it merely as a way to make money. But what kind of emotions, thoughts and convictions were going through Bob Dylans head when he wrote "Hurricane" He layed his feelings, emotions and disgust of the judicial system out on the table so that we could be aware of his "Emotions" on the matter! What pisses me off the most is that alot of people no longer see it that way. My favorite artists, The ones that really matter to me are the ones, who through their medium, changed alot of my thought patterns and certain thoughts on situations such as Dylan & Marley. People who had something to say and said it by pouring out their "Emotions" and thoughts, and said it through song. Anytime one expresses himself whether it be through music, poetry, painting or a novel they are pouring out there feelings and"EMOTIONS" to be heard or seen or read. That is the way we learn and progress. Words on a page, like a great novel, can be moving and a life changing experience. I will use the same "Hurricane" example here. If Lezra Martin had never read the "Sixteenth Round" and had a feeling of "emotions" for this innoccent man behind bars. Rubin "Hurricane" Carter may still be number "74725" today. Why is it impossible to believe a song can do the same thing. Bob Marley is my favorite artist of all time. He is the one that, through his words and music, set up my political mind and his music is what made me read about certain political events and injustices. It was his music, "the root," that started me into veering in the direction of reading the works of Ghandi, Buddha, Malcolm X, Patrice Lumumba, & Frederick Douglas and I very thankful for that. Their work and writings, along with many other great philosophers and teachers of peace, has given me an education that surpasses anything that I learned in school. Music in my opinion is the "small door that opens up to large rooms" So anyone that thinks that music is not emotional, in other words stimulating to your mind to point the that it can make one cry, laugh, or God forbid learn, can kiss my white ass! That is exactly what beautiful things do, teach & touch you, and music is beautiful.
Last edited by bobmarley_fan at Jun 25, 2006,
#13
I read that article.

I think music can trigger emotions, but it's mainly the vocals that can trigger them. Listen to RATM and you'll feel their anger. It's hard to portray the anger/love/apathy whatever in a guitar solo or riff.
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#14
For me, most music now is just...music. Certain bands are able to convey emotions better than others. Recently, I have found Explosions in the Sky to be a very compelling band. Also Mogwai. Instrumental stuff kicks.
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#15
Quote by roythereaper
I read that article.

I think music can trigger emotions, but it's mainly the vocals that can trigger them. Listen to RATM and you'll feel their anger. It's hard to portray the anger/love/apathy whatever in a guitar solo or riff.

i think when you say "music" you kinda also have to look outside the paradigm of pop/rock music, although i wont doubt for a second that pop/rock music can be very emotional. purely instrumental classical music can also be extremely emotive, and for me especially in the Late Classical/Romantic period. songs like Liszt's Liebestraum No. 3, Schubert's Lover's Concerto, Dvorak's Slavonic Dance Dumka, the list goes on and on. it's good stuff, i wish more people would take a little time to look into it and past all the guys like Beethoven and Mozart...they listen to a few of the big pieces by them and decide they dont really like it or wouldnt listen to any more of it, its a shame. Liszt was a total rockstar...crazy solos and skills, looks, and of course, women
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