#1
First the introduction. I'm Ryan new to UG and I have been playing guitar for about 2-4 years. But until I listened to the works of Neil Zaza, I never bothered with learning notes, chords, modes, scales, theory, etc. So I went to the local bookstore and picked me up Guitar for dummies. Just something I could learn the basics from you know? Already having my doublepicking, posture, note reading, skills I just needed to learn the needy greedy . So After reading the book and having some unanswered questions I thought I would post them here

First Question. The "key" The key of A,D,G,C. Is there more keys? Or is there only 4 in the history of guitar? 2nd. How do I determine what chords/notes are in which key? It only says in the book, that the reason they are together within the keys is because they sound good together.

2nd. Minor. I understand the concept of minor I just don't know how to fully fufill it
here you have the E chord. Now to make it minor you drop that G string down 1/2 a step correct? So it will look like this. Why do you only move the G string down? And not the rest of the strings? Its a Em, not a E(g)m? hehe I don't understand why you only move the G string down a 1/2 step only. Shouldn't all the notes be moved down a step since its Em, the whole chord being E, I don't know explain please
------0------- ------0-------
------0------- ------0-------
------1------- E ------0-------Em
------2------- ------2-------
------2------- ------2-------
------0------- ------0-------

In the book it dosen't clearly explain the dominant/minor/major 7th chords.
Just says something about 5th degree if a major scale! I don't know what that means =/ please explain this too.

I'm sure Ill be back to post more questions. This is just a little need to know for as of now please get back to me and help me become a better guitarist!! Thanks UG!
#2
because the Emajor chord is made up of from the notes from the Emajor scale and the Eminor chord from the Eminor scale
#3
question 1. there are 24 keys, though only 12 different ones (i would explain but you would probably be a bit overwhelmed).

question 2. you can tell whether a chord is in a scale because the individual notes making up that chord happen to be in a scale.

question 3 (i think you meant 3 anyway). In the example you gave, you only drop the G string down because for the basic e chord the note on the g string is the third. basic guitar chords (E, A, D) are just plain triads, where there is 1 3rd (the note in the triad that determines whether it is minor or major) and changing the 3rd will make the entire chord different. the other notes in a triad are the root (1st) and the 5th. The root is the note that makes a chord what it is, so if the root of a chord is for example e, the chord will be an e chord. simple, eh?

the 5th in an e chord is a b. in your basic e chord (0 2 2 1 0 0) the b is both the 2nd fret of the a string and the open b string.

hope that cleared up a few things for you, but if you have any more questions please ask.
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Last edited by les_paul_01 at Jun 25, 2006,
#4
A major chord consists of a Root, a 3rd and a fifth. AKA

1 3 5

A minor chord consists of a Root, a flatted third, and a fifth. AKA

1 b3 5

*MOVED*
#5
So,
-----0----- =
-----0----- |
-----1--3rd | Triad (E Chord)
-----2--5th |
-----2--1st |
-----0----- = ? how do I determine which ones are the 3rd,5th,1st to which notes?
#6
Quote by rockadome
So,
-----0----- =
-----0----- |
-----1--3rd | Triad (E Chord)
-----2--5th |
-----2--1st |
-----0----- = ? how do I determine which ones are the 3rd,5th,1st to which notes?


That should be...


|--0--| 
|--0--|
|--1--| [B]3rd.[/B] [I](G#)[/I]
|--2--| [B]1st. [/B][I](E)[/I]
|--2--| [B]5th.[/B] [I](B)[/I]
|--0--|



You look at the corresponding major scale. You're playing E major, so let's take a look at the E major scale.

E - F# - G# - A - B - C# - D# - E.

You take the 1st, 3rd and 5th interval of the major scale to determine your triad - for E major, those notes are E(1st) - G#(3rd) & B(5th)