#1
Can anyone tell me what the G#+ chord is? Also, what does it mean when a chord is augmented?
Ohhh...My head hurts...


Quote by Inahrima
^ have i told you i keep misreading your title as UG's biggest bad greek?
#2
An augmented chord is a chord thats made of the root note, a major third and a augmented fifth.

1 3 #5

you get one on the third note of the harmonic minor scale


For all intervals you have diminished (a halfstep less than usual) and augmented (a halfstep more than usual) versions (except for a unison, which can not be diminished....A to A# for example is a augmented unison, not a minor second)


also of interest on augmented chords: all of its inversions sound exactly the same as between any 2 notes of it you always get a major third
Last edited by seljer at Jun 25, 2006,
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
G#+ contains the notes G# B# and Dx. Those notes are better known as G# C and E.
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but a chord with G# C and E would be the 1st inversion of a C+ chord (which is basically enharmonic to G#+ but its not the chord you want)
#5
Quote by seljer
but a chord with G# C and E would be the 1st inversion of a C+ chord (which is basically enharmonic to G#+ but its not the chord you want)


BGC's post looked correct to me. He correctly named the notes of G#+ and gave a correct fingering.
#7
Quote by psychodelia
BGC's post looked correct to me. He correctly named the notes of G#+ and gave a correct fingering.


But by changing the names of the notes in the chord you're making the chord become a different chord (even though it sounds the same)
#8
Quote by elvenkindje
I'd rather call it a Ab+ chord.. But that's just me
I would too, but depending on the context, you may not be able to.

Quote by seljer
But by changing the names of the notes in the chord you're making the chord become a different chord (even though it sounds the same)
I was simply giving their common names so he would be able to find the notes on his guitar and not go, "What the hell is Dx?"


Sorry for the confusion.
#11
Well, augmented chords are interested in that their actual name would depend a lot on context, as each note is a major third from each proceeding note.

For example...
a C+ chord has the notes: C, E, G#
a E+ chord has the notes: E, G#, B# (enharmonically a C)
a C+ chord has the notes: G#, B#, E

What I'm getting at is that they all have the same notes! A third up from your augmented fifth is your root. That's where the confusion in this thread seems to have arisen.

#12
For example...
a C+ chord has the notes: C, E, G#
a E+ chord has the notes: E, G#, B# (enharmonically a C)
a C+ chord has the notes: G#, B#, E

isnt there some diminished chord, and theres only 3 in the whole chromatic thing because 1 chord covers 4 scales or something each, its
1, b3, b5, b7 or something like that, it makes the chord want to resolve more or something!
- tommy
#13
Quote by tombomb22
isnt there some diminished chord, and theres only 3 in the whole chromatic thing because 1 chord covers 4 scales or something each, its
1, b3, b5, b7 or something like that, it makes the chord want to resolve more or something!


You're on the right track, its a diminished 7 (can also be represented by a degree sign). 1 b3 b5 b7 is only a half diminished, you want 1 b3 b5 bb7. Since each degree is a minor third away from the next, you could name any note of the chord as its root and it would be a dim7 with that root.