#1
Hi, I was just at CyberFret and found the positions for the minor pentatonic scale, and now I'm looking for the major pentatonic scale positions, does anybody have a look for a simple graphical representation of them? Thanks
#2
----------------------------8-10-----------------
-----------------------8-10----------------------
------------------7-9----------------------------
-------------7-10--------------------------------
--------7-10-------------------------------------
--8--10------------------------------------------


thats the c major pentatonic scale, thats the basic shape,
Quote by Doolittle
Do it for Hedwig!
#3
To simplify things a lot, if you move the minor pentatonic scale down by three frets, you'll get the major pentatonic. Like this:

-5--8-          -2--5-
-5--8-          -2--5-
-5-7--          -2-4--
-5-7--          -2-4--
-5-7--          -2-4--
-5--8-          -2--5-
Amin penta      Amaj penta
#5
Quote by Applehead
but thats starting on F sharp? please explain !


The first note on the E string doesn't necessarily signify the root note... start it on the 5th fret if you like. It doesn't matter what your first note is, aslong as you emphasize the correct chord tones.
#6
oh right! just when i am getting my head aroud things, someone comes in and says "yeah but it doesnt necessarily mean that".. heh heh

complicated stuff at deeper levels i tell thee
#7
Yes, pentatonic is deep, yes

Anyway, what Johnjones said is correct, the lowest note doesn't have to be the root. I merely added the note so you could see the figure going down three frets. And if you look close, you'll notice that F#minor pentatonic has the same notes as Amajor pentatonic
#9
^ Yes, the relative minor of A major is F# Minor
Been away, am back
#10
Woooo Hoooo, look at me go shamone !

you guys have really helped me with this, so thanks. let me buy you a virtual beer
#11
The easiest way to explain why its the relative minor, is this:

R  W  W  H  W  [b]W[/b]  W  H
A  B  C# D  E  [b]F#[/b] G# A

^  ^  ^  ^  ^  [b]^[/b]  ^
|  |  |  |  |  [b]|[/b]  Locrian
|  |  |  |  |  [b]Aeolian[/b]
|  |  |  |  Mixoydian
|  |  |  Lydian
|  |  Phrygian
|  Dorian
Ionian


If you use the A Major scale, notice how the F# falls under the same degree as the Aeolian (Minor) Mode.

There is a circle thing which shows you all the relatives, ill try find it.


Another example;
If you used the Gb Major scale, Gb's relative minor is Eb, or D#.

R  W  W  H  W  [b]W[/b]  W  H
Gb Ab Bb Cb Db [b]Eb[/b] F  Gb

^  ^  ^  ^  ^  [b]^[/b]  ^
|  |  |  |  |  [b]|[/b]  Locrian
|  |  |  |  |  [b]Aeolian[/b]
|  |  |  |  Mixoydian
|  |  |  Lydian
|  |  Phrygian
|  Dorian
Ionian



EDIT:
Been away, am back
Last edited by Logz at Jun 26, 2006,
#12
you can also use different pentatonic shapes to get say: an F major pentatonic, and go all over the fretboard, but that's using different shapes n stuff and you need a good ear.
- tommy
#13
So, I know there's 5 different ways of playing a minor pentatonic scale...are there certain, similar methods for the major pentatonic? Or if I just move the minors scales do they become major? I don't think that'd work because of the intervals, but I just haven't been able to find the 2 note per string maj. pentatonic fingerings.